When zero is not dietary 0

A zero is a number not a letter. Some people find this confusing. It seems like an odd conception prone to error. In trying to map a healthy lifestyle, there are many zeros. We perceive they mean the same. They don’t. For example, there is a mathematical zero – pure in essence. Then there is a dietary 0 that may not be pure at all. Dietary 0 may actually be harmful.

Zero, specifically the number 0. is a primal state. Whether divided by, added to, subtracted from, or multiplied with zero, Thee answer is always 0. What isn’t xero is dietary 0. Dietary 0 hardly ever compares with numeric 0. Dietary 0 is often a much larger number.

I asked several managers. All indicated staff were all vegans. If one was not s/he had to eat off premises. The chances of polluting a vegan dining area was zero. Is it a dietary 0? As long as it’s not mixed with the food is the general wisdom

According to FDA guidelines, “http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm064911.htm”>any food Less than 0.5 g per RACC and per labeled serving (or for meals and main dishes, less than 0.5 g per labeled serving) is considered dietary 0.

Of course, key phrase is per serving. Servings are noted on FDA dietary nutrition labels that are usually found on all packaged foods. Eating multiple servings change dietary 0 to higher numbers and values. What may seem to have 0 fat per serving may add up to a few grams of fat.

It is easy. Suppose you make a sandwich using fat-free dairy or soy cheese. One slice is a serving. A sandwich with 4 slices delivers about 2 grams of fat from fat-free cheese.

In my article on artificial sweeteners, 0 calories isn’t necessarily calories. Calories relate to sugars and starches. Artificial sweeteners are not considered as calories. They may raise blood sugar levels. They may also be seen as “sugar” by body sensors. This triggers insulin flow. Because artificial sweeteners aren’t included as calories, they also may not be truly dietary 0.

Drinking water is dietary zero. Clear sport drinks and diet drinks are likely not to be dietary 0. They may contain artificial sweeteners, They may actually work against the hydrating properties of pure water or sparkling water or seltzer.

Dietary 0 is deceptive with fat and cholesterol. Finding low fat and low cholesterol foods have quantifiable statistics. Understand that meat, fish, cheeses have high fats and cholesterol values. Any product that has these is not dietary 0 as far as fat free or cholesterol free.

Foods such as fruits and vegetables deliver dietary 0 fat but have sugars and starches that add calories. Unused calories are metabolized as fat.

Some fruits and vegetables are made into oils that may be fatty but claim to be healthier fat distributions. Yet total fat may be high @ 22% RDA per serving.

Considering food products that are fat-free, sugar-free, dairy-free, lactose-free, and calorie-free are not innocuous invitations to indulge on eating sprees.

Sometimes freedom (especially dietary freedom) may be littered with deceptions and obstacles. Understanding your dietary needs and servings, like freedom, are drenched with responsibilities. There are no zeros or free passes. Dietary 0 is a marketing ploy to appeal to simplicity. The art and science of eating right and right for you and your health.

Hire a competent nutritionist as your guide. Micromanage your lifestyles from how and what you eat, your activities, and needs. Avoid dietary 0 foods. Dietary 0 is often the direct opposition of what mathematical zero is meant to be. Dietary 0 is far worse than 0.

No sugar added not what you think

Got a sweet tooth? Sugars often get a bad reputation for being the instigator behind obesity, diabetes, cavities, and an entire set of conditions and sicknesses. There are often other reasons. Sugars are part of an essential family of nutrients that your body needs. They are called carbohydrates and consist of several types of sugars (simple carbohydrates), starches (complex carbohydrates), and fiber. Simple carbohydrates are those easily absorbed by the body for quick energy. Starches are absorbed at slower rates for more consistent, longer energy.Fiber is key to helping digestion; it helps the body move food through the digestive tract, reduces serum cholesterol, and contributes to disease protection. People are addicted to carbohydrates. Are processed food with no sugar added a healthy choice when avoiding excess consumption of carbohydrates?

Walk through the supermarket aisles an note how many foods have the words No Sugar Added. It’s a common marketing deception. It doesn’t mean that no sweetener was added. Those sweeteners are not listed as carbohydrates on most nutrition panels but they are listed ingredients. The two most popular are Aspartame and Sucralose. These can be more harmful than sugar.

Sugar is good for you but too much sugar has been negatively associated with mood swings, tooth decay, diabetes, and weight management.

Carbohydrates are found in grains (rice, wheat, etc.), fruits, vegetables, and legumes (lentils, peas, chickpeas, beans, soybeans and peanuts). Legumes add amounts of vegetable proteins and fats that are necessary nutrients to maintain your body’s muscles, cells, and other structural needs. None of these foods have cholesterol. Living on a vegan (all the above) diet will provide the necessary nutrients to energize and provide vitamins and phytonutrients.

Unprocessed foods that are rich in phytonutrients help provide support against diseases or conditions. There are over 1,000 phytonutrients in the various foods that are in a vegan diet.

As part of the standard nutritional panel, sugar is a carbohydrate, an essential ingredient your body needs for functioning. A carbohydrate consists 3 ways – sugars, starches, and fibers. There two more common sugars – sucrose (the powdered stuff you add to coffee and recipes) and fructose (derived from fruits and vegetables). Both help make the glucose that are essential for living. Foods with no sugar added sound healthy but they may also result in harming your body’s natural processing to create glucose. Your brain requires glucose for all those things you think about and do.

Simple carbohydrates include sugars found naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables, milk, and milk products. They also include sugars added during food processing and refining. Complex carbohydrates include whole grain breads and cereals, starchy vegetables and legumes. Many of the complex carbohydrates are good sources of fiber. A combination of these are necessary as fuel for proper body function. High quantities are considered toxic so no added sugar appears to make sense. Does this make no sugar added foods make sense?

Carbohydrates are very necessary and dietary recommendations (RDA) are specified by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as outlined on nutritional panels of packaged foods. For a 150 pound individual, mostly sedentary, at middle age there are average RDA noted. The standard recommendation for carbohydrate is 45-65% of total calories. This means if 1800 calories are eaten each day, the recommended amount of carbohydrate is 202-292 grams based on 45-65% calories from carbohydrate. They are associated with calorie needs.

Calories are energy units that foods provide – some come from fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Eating calories is necessary for performing any activity, including autonomic activities within your body. Your gender, weight, age, and height factor into your minimum calorie requirement. If you are active, you require more calories. If you are sedentary, you need fewer calories. Wise consumption of calories is closely associated with weight maintenance, gain, or loss.

Calorie deprivation can kill you. Over long periods, calorie restriction can result in stress on your body’s required internal functions. Anyone trying to play with rapid or extreme weight loss by using calorie restriction, MUST do so with (and under advisement) of a qualified physician.

Added sugars to most processed foods escalate calories to meet applied marketing tastes. Making processed products that have no sugar added or sugar-free by substituting sugar and calories may be more harmful to your health.

No sugar added doesn’t necessarily translate to fewer carbohydrates. Many canned fruit juices and deserts claim that no sugar is added to the product and there’s 100% juice. Fruits have natural carbohydrate content. In a bottle of Cranberry Juice Cocktail, you will find other juices like Apple and Grape that have higher “natural” sugars that thrust carbohydrates per serving up, while the canned juice can claim that no sugar was added.

There are also natural sweeteners. One that is found in many “No Sugar Added” products is Stevia. Stevia is from a plant and has the approval from the USA Food and Drug Administration for use as a sweetener. Stevia contributes no calories and no carbohydrates, according to the way measurements are taken. If Stevia contributes no calories and adds sweetness from nature, why is it not as popular as sugar?

Stevia rebaudiana, is reportedly up to 250 times sweeter than sugar and contains virtually no calories but people don’t necessarily embrace Stevia as well as sugar.

Stevia has a bitter after taste that don’t correspond well with many sweet sensory receptors on your tongue. Cells, organs, and the brain thrive on certain amounts of glucose. Stevia may not provide that, although it contributes perceived natural sweetness in dietary research studies. While people suffering with sugar associated diabetes and obesity symptoms.

Splenda or sucralose is a popular non-caloric sweetener added to many foods. Sucralose is designed to sound like the most common form of sugar, sucrose. Sucralose is a synthetic method of playing with sucrose. Sucrose is a naturally occurring sugar, a caloric carbohydrate. Sucralose, on the other hand, is an artificial sweetener, produced in a lab. A technical combines 3 sucrose molecules by adding chlorine to make trichlorosucrose, so the chemical structures of the two sweeteners are related, but not identical. The addition of Chlorine removes sucralose from the family of carbohydrates and caloric values. While it offers sweetness to the taste, some feel it has a sour aftertaste. That’s the chlorine – a toxic chemical used to whiten washed clothes or clean your swimming pool. Sucralose was patented and tested, first approved for use as a non-nutritive sweetener in Canada. It is marketed as Splenda.

Another popular sweetener is Aspartame and is marketed as NutraSweet and Equal. Aspartame is a common sweetener additive to sodas, fruit drinks, and other products. It is an artificial substance that claims to be as much as 200-times sweeter than sucrose. Aspartame, available since the 1960’s, is not a carbohydrate and does not add calories. Aspartame is made by joining together the amino acids aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are found naturally in many foods.

Every so often there is a research study that claims Aspartame consumption may be involved in the formation of cancer but many tests use small samples or inappropriate dosing of animals. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has set recommendations for Aspartame. The FDA has set the ADI (Average Daily Intake) for aspartame at 50 milligrams per approximately 2 pounds of body weight. That means if you weigh 150 pounds, the FDA allows 0.5 grams of consumption. Unfortunately, there are virtually no products that list Aspartame content per serving on any packaging.

For dieters, however, Aspartame is a no sugar added winner. Grape Juice has about 150 calories per serving and 40 grams of carbohydrates. Aspartame Diet Grape Juice has about 5 calories per serving and 5 to 15 grams of carbohydrates, depending how much juice is actually in the drink. Soda, the most popular beverage, There are about 90 calories per 8-ounce serving of Coca Cola and 25 grams of carbohydrates. Aspartame-laced Coca Cola Zero (aimed at dieters) delivers 0 calories and 0 carbohydrates. There is no sugar added to Coke Zero but is it diet-friendly?

The problem is soda should not be drunk by the liters. It is not water. The lack of carbohydrates and necessary sugar your body needs will keep initiate hunger. The potential to snack and eat poorly may result in weight gain, a study suggests.

No sugar added partners with Sugar-Free through the use of sugar alcohols that are found in chewing gum, chocolates, cookies, and cakes. Sugar alcohols commonly found in foods are sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, isomalt, and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (found in sugar-free protein bars and supplements). You might find sugar alcohols in fruits and berries, but those naturally occurring sugars are sent to the lab.. The carbohydrate in these plant products is altered through a chemical process. These sugar substitutes provide somewhat fewer calories than adding table sugar (sucrose).

No sugar added is a short-cut to dieting and may help diabetics control blood sugar levels. Dieters seeking lower carbohydrate solutions calculate actual Net Carbs by subtracting fiber grams from Total Carbohydrates. This formula is used in the Atkin’s Diet or as ketosis – but these diets shun carbohydrates.

Your body and you love carbohydrates. Carbohydrate-based calories deliver energy in most parts of the globe. The nutrition panels of processed or packaged foods list amounts of carbohydrates per serving. Choosing the right foods will provide the calories you need for your activity.

Common sense dictates that (to provide adequate energy throughout the day through carbohydrate calorie consumption) eat breakfast like a king (queen), lunch like a prince (princess), and dinner like a pauper. Following these guidelines may help you achieve a healthy weight without compromising energy.

In the USA, we have been programmed to eat more at dinner than breakfast. Breakfast is your most important meal. Hectic commuting schedules incite judgment errors avoiding the day’s requirements without a full tank of valued calories. Your energy often is as important as what you wear. Alas, United States reserves big meals for dinner. Ever consider doing away with Thanksgiving dinner and doing a Thanksgiving breakfast?

No sugar added is not what you think. Products with no sugar added don’t taste the same and aren’t necessarily absorbed as well. If you are aiming at weight loss, diet and activity are the age-old truths. It’s not a quick-fix process. You can eat and have your cake too (just a bite instead of a slice). Adapting to your optimum calorie consumption through a vegan diet, using a good calorie calculator can help you reach your goals. Eating well, keeping healthy and attractive are your responsibilities. There are no short cuts. Avoid processed foods with No Sugar Added.

Sugar Free Oreo or Foods are not sweetener free

Walking up and down the aisles of the supermarket, I have been noticing that more foods are indicating “No Sugar Added” or “Sugar Free” on their labels. I was passing the cookie section and I noticed something almost obscene – Sugar Free Oreo cookies. The traditional Nabisco Oreo Cookie, was recently cited in a study showing Oreo cookies were more addictive than cocaine or heroin. An American favorite, the Oreo cookie has come out with a Sugar Free version but that doesn’t mean it’s sweetener free.

According to customer reviews on Netrition.com, 26 reviewers gave the sugar free Oreo cookies an average 4.6 rating out of a maximum of 5. It’s tasty!

According to the USA Federal Drug Administration rules, there are specific requirements for manufacturers adding “Sugar Free” to their labels. So how do manufacturers produce sugar free cookies that are palatable to consumers who love sweetness?

It’s kind of a trick. The matter is how sugar is defined. According to various studies and definitions, sugar is seen as chemical compounds such as sucrose and fructose. Neither of these are added to any of the Sugar Free products. Instead, these products have Sugar Alcohols added.

Sugar Alcohols may be derived from nature and can deliver sweetness. Sugar alcohols belong to a chemical class called Polyols. They do not intoxicate but they may have other side effects since your body doesn’t recognize them as food. The sugar alcohols commonly found in foods are sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, xylitol, isomalt, and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates. Sugar alcohols come from plant products such as fruits and berries. The carbohydrate in these plant products is altered through a chemical process. These sugar substitutes provide somewhat fewer calories than table sugar (sucrose), mainly because they are not well absorbed and may even have a small laxative effect, when taken as several servings instead of one.

Sugar alcohols vary when it comes to glycemic index values. Most sugar alcohols tend to have lower glycemic indexes than sugars. Those watching sugar blood levels should contact a qualified nutritionist to determine whether sugar free products made from sugar alcohols are safe to use.

Are sugar alcohols healthy? Some studies indicate they are non-cariogenic, low-glycaemic (potentially helpful in diabetes and cardiovascular disease), low-energy and low-insulinaemic (potentially helpful in obesity), low-digestible (potentially helpful in the colon), osmotic (cleansing) carbohydrates. Sugar free has some health potentials, if used wisely.

Sugar Free cookies and products tend to be more expensive than sugared products. Economically, you’d think twice before noshing down a pound of these while watching TV.

Most sugar free cookies and sugar free chocolates use Maltitol as a primary sugar alcohol sweetner ingredient. Its sweetness has been rated at about 70% to 90% that of sugar. It has a higher glycemic index of other sugar alcohols.

High Maltitol intake may be the cause of intestinal gas and cramping, but some people may find themselves with diarrhea. In Europe, the maximum recommended dosage from foods is about 60 grams. According to the Calorie Control Council, Maltitol shares the laxative qualities of other sugar alcohol blends. As a result, those who take Maltitol can expect the regularity of their bowel movements to change. If you decide to eat products with Maltitol, you’d be wise to start with a small amount and judge the reaction — as well whether you plan to be mobile a few hours later. Maltitol has cleansing properties but not necessarily positive or predictable ones.

Maltitol is the principle ingredient of sugar free Oreo cookies. According to nutritional panel information, it has 8 grams of sugar alcohol per serving of 2 cookies. It may take 7 or 8 servings to send you to the bathroom so the habitual snacking potential isn’t as favorable as regular Oreo cookies.

Sugar alcohols differ from artificial sweeteners such as NutraSweet, Sweet & Low, and Splenda. They offer no calories. Splenda is often substituted for sugar in recipes to make sugar free cookies. Stevia is a plant that is native to South America. It is probably best known as a source of natural sweeteners where natives have used it for centuries. Sugar alcohols are preferred by manufacturers that make processed cookies and desserts, though, sometimes, you might find Stevia or an artificial sweetener included in the ingredients. They are intended as sweet enhancers.

Sugar alcohols help weight and sugar conscious individual have their cake and eat it too. Long term potential ill effects (other than intestinal cramps and diarrhea – from overdose) may yet need to be found. Like all sugar subs, taste may not be the same as sugar. If you use sugar free products responsibly in your diet, these sugar alcohols may allow your sweet tooth some satisfaction. Finding sweet in your daily living can be easy. Examine the sweetener options, take the taste tests, and see whether you can go sugar free.

Admittedly, most prefer sugar. It’s a habit that is hard to break.