A stroke and sleep time

Oversleeping may cause a stroke. That’s what researchers found ay the University of Cambridge in England. Ironically, the USA National Institute of Health indicates lack of sleep can lead to a stroke. To what end? In most instances vascular plaque may cause a stroke as well as a heart attack. Research does offer a great deal of ambiguity. Often there are many things that are overlooked. Let’s consider possibilities of a stroke and sleep time.

Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? This may be an early symptom of a possible stroke. Like a heart attack, a stroke is a medical emergency. The difference is it affects the brain. A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or severely reduced, depriving brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. While there ay be similar causes, a stroke is very different than a heart attack. New research appears to indicate that stroke possibilities may be associated with the amount you sleep.

Strokes might be related somehow to how long you sleep. Strokes often result from vascular conditions that block natural blood flow. Blockages in the arteries around your heart may lead to heart problems. Blockages in the carotid arteries (at the left and right sides of your neck) may be likely causes of possible strokes. The carotid arteries supply blood to the large, front part of the brain, where thinking, speech, personality and where sensory and motor functions reside. A stroke occurs when a blockage affects a certain part or parts of the brain.

There are different types of stroke occurrences. A transient ischemic attack (also called TIA or “mini-stroke”) is one of the most important warning signs of a stroke. A TIA occurs when a blood clot briefly blocks an artery that supplies blood to the brain. TIA are indicators of the likelihood of getting a stroke. The USA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists three main types of stroke: ischemic stroke (caused by blood clots) hemorrhagic stroke (caused by ruptured blood vessels that cause brain bleeding) transient ischemic attack (TIA) (a “mini-stroke,” caused by a temporary blood clot). Fewer people with high cholesterol levels are monitored for brain vessel blockages than heart blockages. Can brain blood blocks be behind why some need to oversleep?

According to the National Sleep Foundation guidelines, there are specific ranges of sleep time that experts recommend for health and performance. We can surmise that interrupted or short sleeping can be unhealthy but what about sleeping too long?

Britain’s Cambridge University just released a study that sleeping too long may possibly increase the risk of having a stroke. Among older people, sleeping too long may double their risks. Based on raw scores, The absolute risk of stroke was 4.1% for less than six hours’ sleep, 3.1% for six to eight hours, and 5.3% for over eight hours, before isolating age, sex, and other differences within samples. During a 10-year study with 346 participants , researchers reported “After adjusting for various factors including age and sex, the researchers found that people who slept longer than eight hours a day were at a 46% greater risk of stroke than average.”

Considering those possibilities that consistent oversleeping beyond guidelines might result in possible brain damage makes a stroke and sleep time somewhat frightening.

According to the USA National Institute of Health, a lack of sleep can also be dangerous and may be the cause of some vehicular accidents. Ongoing sleep deficiency is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke. While some small sleep studies indicate that Sleep Apnea interrupted sleep may lead to a type of stroke, the correlations are based on small samples.

Yet there’s more than Sleep Apnea that can interrupt sleep. Sleep deficiency results in a higher than normal blood sugar level, which may increase your risk for diabetes. On the reverse trend, some dieters may lose sleep due to low sugar levels during sleep.

Your body and brain require lots of energy during sleep. Rapid Eye Movements or REM are very active states when you dream and many neurocognitive processes are automatically performed. Abnormal sugar levels can result in hunger pains as you get up for a snack or hot chocolate (which may have caffeine to keep you awake).

During dream sleep, which occurs around 4 times per full sleep period, electrical brain signals are similar to those when you are awake. While your body is paralyzed, your active within your dreams. You have rapid eye movements or REM beneath closed eyelids when you dream. Dream sleep is very dynamic as chemicals help code memories and maintain cognitive mechanisms. They occur in your sleep pattern whether you sleep 6hours or eight hours. These are normal and healthy. There is no correlation with stroke.

The association of stroke incidence and long sleep is part of the EPIC-Norfolk program that provides funding to the University of Cambridge in England. Researchers from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge followed just under 10,000 people aged 42-81 years of age from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort over 9.5 years. During 1998-2000 and then again four years later, they asked the cohort how many hours on average they slept in a day. Analysis associated oversleep with stroke incidence but exactly what the reason might be is unclear.

Many illnesses may disrupt normal sleep patterns and pain or discomforts may disturb sleep. While napping may offer considerable health benefits, it depends when and how efficiently you sleep and at what levels of sleep patterns. Napping at the wrong times may each day may chronically disrupt normal circadian patterns of habitual sleep.

The Cambridge study used cancer patients as part of the sample. Irregular and long sleep are likely cohorts as patients advance through the stages. Can stroke occur? Possibly but how do you correlate it with normal over sleeping?

Chronic Circadian disruptions have been shown to help elevate certain cancer and cardiovascular diseases. There are many circadian disruptions that can significantly alter how briefly or how long you sleep. Making up on lost sleep may be difficult.

Sleeping longer on weekends may disrupt your weekday patterns so that, when you return to work, you feel tired. NREM sleep and REM sleep continue to alternate through the night in a cyclical fashion. On weekends you are likely to sleep and awaken naturally. On work days, many use an alarm. If you awaken from your last REM you are likely to feel more refreshed than awakening from an NREM cycle. An alarm doesn’t always synch with your sleep patterns.

Try to sleep according to the National Sleep Foundation guidelines. Good habitual sleep is as healthy as activities and sleeping too briefly or too long as habits may result in some type of problem. My perspective is not to lose sleep over it. There are dozens of more plausible issues that can lead to heart attacks and strokes. There are many sleep specialists that perform sleep studies to help you find your normal sleep pattern and how to get there.

If you have high LDL cholesterol levels, it might be wise to investigate blockages in your carotid arteries. Elevated cholesterol isn’t just a cardiology issue. The test is a painless sonogram. Try to correlate the results. Obstructive sleep apnea may result in sleepiness through the day and carotid artery disease. Ergo, the possibility of a stroke.

Artery Stents and Side Effects

Diet fads come and go. Indiscretions and choices of lifestyles may come to haunt you through normal aging, genetics, and effects from certain illnesses. Over time your arteries may become narrowed and blocked because of build-up of a fatty material called plaque, which is made up of cholesterol and other substances. Like the crusty plaque that forms around teeth, arterial and vascular plaque silently obstructs the passage of blood and nutrients throughout your body. Artery stents are light little inserts that are surgically implanted to help open obstructed arteries. Artery stents are minimally invasive life savers that may prevent heart attacks and strokes. It’s good to check your vital statistics often. Irregularities may indicate arterial blockages.

Artery and vascular obstructions are known as atherosclerosis and the American Heart Association compiles statistics annually. In 2009, there were 644,240 hospital stays that included the implantation of a cardiac artery stent.
The rate of any cardiac stent procedure rose steadily from 1999 to 2006 by 61 percent and
then declined sharply between 2006 and 2009 by 27 percent. Sclerosis, a stiffening of a structure, has been associated with many diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis and ALS (which interfere with nervous system functions). Atherosclerosis is silent. Arteries have no pain sensors to alert of plaque build-up. It is the silent killer that leads to heart attacks and brain strokes.

The use of artery stents have greatly help reduce the incidence of heart disease and brain infarctions but implantation of artery stents isn’t a miraculous cure-all. Diet and exercise routines are fundamental. They are more minimally invasive approaches of more complex surgeries that are alerts that death was nearer than you thought.

Stents reduce the incidence of heart attacks and strokes but not necessarily lives, according to Duke University research. The artery stent was first introduced in 1994 and various technological innovations have improved their overall effectiveness. Prior to stents, the severity of atherosclerosis usually required more invasive procedures, such as arterial or coronary bypasses. President Clinton and TV host David Letterman are popular recipients of those surgeries. You will note that these are very conscious of lifestyle changes to maintain weight for health.

Surgically implanting artery stents leaves no superficial scars. A catheter enters your groin area or your wrist to physically explore your arteries. Where significant blockage is visible, a stent is implanted via the catheter. For most of the procedure, you are under mild sedation – relaxed but conscious. A stent is like a spring of mesh that is inserted to support the artery wall. With time, the mesh and the artery wall unify. Heart artery stents wer approved by the FDA in 1994. Newer stents add a drug to the metallic material. This helps reduce Restenosis, a condition where the stent may collapse. Using these drug induced stents and certain prescribed oral medications help stabilize stent implantation.

Commonly, artery stents are used in surgical procedures called percutaneous trans-luminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), also known as balloon angioplasty. These procedures are intended to reduce the risk of heart attacks or other complications stemming from coronary heart disease that involves the blockage of the arteries.

Virtually non-invasive radiological detection of atherosclerosis has emerged in the 21st century and CAT or MRI scans and Ultrasound may be used as part of routine searches for atherosclerosis in specific arteries. This may account for the rise of artery stent intervention from 1999 to 2006. Angioplasty will be necessary if plaque accumulation is noted and is a way that artery stents are implanted. If no stent is implanted, it is an ambulatory procedure with no hospital stay. An implant requires at least 24-hour stay.

An artery stent was implanted. For around 2 years following an implant procedure, you will be prescribed a blood thinner drug (i.e Plavix, Warfarin, Xarelto) and low dose aspirin as an anti-coagulant. You are advised to reduce exercise and increase proper diet for a few weeks after surgery.

Common side effects of blood thinners are:

◾Heavy menstrual flows
◾Bloody or discolored urine or feces.
◾Somewhat frequent nosebleeds.
◾Bleeding gums.
◾Prolonged bleeding from a cut and possible bruising.

Less reported side effects may include:

•Difficulty with breathing or swallowing
•Dizziness
•Headache
•Leg weakness and Numbness
•Paralysis (partial area restricted)

While not all blood thinners are affected by the same substances, a number of foods, herbs, and medications can interact with blood-thinning medications. This can render the drug more or less effective than your dosage would suggest.

Many physicians, in an effort to reduce cholesterol levels as a possible cause of atherosclerosis, also add statins (Lipitor) may lead to increased toxicity such as myopathy (inflammation of the muscles). Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. The most frequrntly reported statin side effects are:

Headache
Nausea
Vomiting
Constipation
Diarrhea
Rashes
Weakness and muscle pain

People who smoke have an additional concern over Nicotine. The nicotine in cigarettes directly affects the inflammatory response, causing the release of more cytokines.Cytokines serve as molecular messengers between cells and regulate various inflammatory responses. There are many types of cytokines in the bloodstream and some are researched as possible sources of arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other pain or numbing diseases.

There is often a great emphasis in controlling plaque and vulnerable plaque in the arteries leading to the heart and brain. Less emphasis is focused on other narrower blood vessels that extend to the periphery of the body, such as hands and feet. The possible side effects of blood thinners, statins, and nicotine, plus vulnerable plaque, may be restricting blood flow and cytokines to various point s in legs and arms.

The effects of drugs, diet, lifestyle, and undetected vascular disintegrity may be associated with a less common side effect of artery stents. They are peripheral neuropathies, a numbness or tingling of hands and feet.

I had numbness in the feet. I have since found several cases that have complained about some form of peripheral neuropathy that require assisted walking devices. Nearly all reported having at least one implanted stent. A few had as many as four stents. Medications can manage neuropathy symptoms but none claim to cure it. I have found long-term acupuncture to be effective. Acupuncturists offer differing techniques. I found New York’s East Wind Healing Arts to be the best.

Stents are used to help support decayed arteries and collapsing organs. They are used after coronary episodes and to prevent first episodes. As a wise approach in exploring annual routine health care, a comprehensive center of cardiologists, who also specialize as internists, may be sensitive enough to help ward off any problems.

Diet and exercise help. Unfortunately, people of all shapes and sizes may be susceptible to atherosclerosis by virtue of genetics. Following responsible diets and physical activities are good avenues to support heat health within the generally healthy population.

It is likely that where atherosclerosis is present in arteries, there may be peripheral vascular disease found in the blood vessels feeding and protecting other areas of your body.

Your body likes balance and works hard towards maintaining a stable balance. It has complex mechanisms that control internal fight/flight stress at microcellular levels. Sometimes it’s imperceptible while other times pain and inflammation may occur. While implanting artery stents may breed a host of annoying side effects, maintain an active relationship with your physicians and work hard toward living happily ever after.

When necessary, artery stents are life savers but following more responsible lifestyles may add years of living well. As to dealing with side effects? Sometimes you have to weigh side effects or no life at all. Doctors and patients should be attentive and aware of those possible side effects and cooperate with healthcare and alternatives as successful treatments.

Is salmon cholesterol heart healthy?

In following a heart healthy lifestyle, there are 5 numbers to key in on:

Diastolic Blood Pressure
Systolic Blood Pressure
LDL Blood Level
HDL Blood Level
Triglycerides Blood Level

People say that dietary intake of fish, particularly Salmon, help keep these numbers in check. Many don’t really know what these numbers mean. It’s actually a little complex and ironically simple. Many don’t really know what these numbers mean. People line up to eat salmon because it’s heart healthy. Is it?

When it comes to rising value, Salmon prices are skyrocketing around the world. Farmed salmon sold at Costco for about $5.00 per pound in 2012. In 2014, the price is hovering at $12 per pound. Wild salmon is now between $17 and $25.00 per pound. Touted a heart healthy foods, salmon and tuna has moved from the common into the rare and people are lining up to buy it. Is salmon as heart healthy as many people think?

Someone asked my opinion of blood test results. His LDL (bad cholesterol) was a little over 200. His doctor wanted to prescribe Lipitor, a common statin drug, to help reduce the LDL. LDL comprises about 70% of the natural cholesterol that circulates in the bloodstream. It is comprised mostly of fat which then tends to get deposited in the arteries creating plaques. This plaque build-up is believed to lead to to atherosclerosis, which is a hardening and narrowing of the arteries and a large risk factor for heart disease. My friend pointed out that his diet consists of salmon, tuna, and trout on salad. He thought he at heart healthy. I advised him that heart healthy fish may not be healthy at all levels. Each adds dietary cholesterol. The American Heart Association recommends consuming 300 milligrams per day of dietary cholesterol or, if you have a 100-mg/dl ( milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL)) in blood serum, to 200 milligrams per day.

Salmon is heart healthy but only on certain levels. When compared to meat, a 4-ounce portion of salmon offers body-healthy omega 3 fatty acids, a huge helping of protein and a complement of crucial B vitamins. That does sound great!

The American Heart Association recommends limiting dietary cholesterol intake. Cholesterol is found in any animal source such as meat, fish, and shellfish. It is particularly high in organ meats, such as liver and tongue. Next time you spread pate on a cracker, consider how much cholesterol you’re consuming.

Your body produces cholesterol naturally. Your body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs. Cholesterol is a lipid and each cell of your body has a phospholipid bi-layer that offers it protection and balance. It acts as the skin of each cell. Your liver is the primary organ responsible for the production of cholesterol in your body, although very small amounts are made by the lining of the small intestine and the body’s individual cells. The livers cholesterol production is released into your bloodstream to feed all the parts of your body that need it.

Vegetables have no cholesterol so do not add dietary cholesterol. As meat and fish eaters, these foods add dietary cholesterol. A 4-ounce portion of salmon has about 68 milligrams of cholesterol. A similar size of tuna delivers about 50 milligrams of cholesterol. Surprisingly, a 4-ounce lean cut of bottom round sirloin delivers 43 milligrams of cholesterol. When it comes to adding dietary cholesterol, salmon is a big contributor. When it comes to maintaining healthy cholesterol levels naturally, salmon may not be the heart healthier choice. A 4-ounce portion of salmon has 50% more cholesterol than meat. Salmon is considered healthier.

The cholesterol portion of your blood test rates these lipids: LDL, HDL and Triglycerides. LDL is the bad cholesterol that may result in artery-clogging plaques. The American Heart Association considers LDL ay 190mg/dl extremely high. HDL is the good cholesterol. They help prevent LDL from sticking to your arteries. With HDL cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.

High levels of omega-3 fatty acids, or what researchers refer to as fish oils, make salmon a shoe-in when it comes to improving levels of HDL, or “good” cholesterol. The contributing factor may be less than a 5% gain. It may not be enough. Therapy to raise the concentration of HDL cholesterol includes weight loss, smoking cessation, aerobic exercise, and pharmacologic management with niacin and fibrates. I found 1000mg Niacin per day increased HDL by 50% but check routinely. Taking more than 1,000mg per day could be harmful to your liver. The main thing about Omega 3 is that this natural oil complex is essential for heart health in managing your diet.

High Triglycerides are another heart-unhealthy factor that few consider. Your body is capable of producing the right amount of triglycerides it needs. A triglyceride level of 150 mg/dL or higher is one of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk for heart disease and other disorders, including diabetes. The term triglyceride means sugars and certain fats. The mean level of triglycerides for American adults age 20 and older is 144.2 mg/dl. That is why dietary triglycerides in reducing carbohydrates and certain fats are so important. When an average level is 144.2mg/dl, it means many are over 150mg/dl.

Triglycerides may be related to lifestyle and your diet. Many people have high triglyceride levels due to being overweight/obese, physical inactivity, and a diet very high in carbohydrates (60 percent or more of calories).

Triglycerides are associated with a fatty acid called Omega 6 and, although it is a vital nutrient, it helps promote body inflammation. Dietary sources in meat are primarily in the lower, pricey cuts in the loin. Less desirable top cuts have lower levels of Omega 6
so, as triglycerides go, top sirloin is healthier than bottom sirloin. Omega 6 is a saturated fat that can inflame and clog arteries when ingested beyond recommended dietary levels. The recommended level is about 5 parts Omega 3 to 1 part Omega 6. The reality of most food consumers is closer to 1 part Omega 3 to 15 parts of Omega 6.

Salmon, Tuna, Trout, Mackerel, Cod, Tilapia, and Sardines have little Omega 6 fats and much more Omega 6 fats. Many people have high triglyceride levels due to being overweight/obese, physical inactivity, cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption and/or a diet very high in carbohydrates (60 percent or more of calories). High triglycerides are a lifestyle-related risk factor; however, underlying diseases or genetic disorders can be the cause. Omega 3 contributes to reducing body inflammation and, though a saturated fat, also offers polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats considered healthier. Studies of Omega 3 and Omega 6 ratios cite evidence of better health. Since salmon, mackerel, and sardines are higher in Omega 3 fats, they are very heart healthy on a triglyceride level.

Of course, you can get the benefits of Omega 3 (and Omega 6) from a non-cholesterol vegan-friendly source. It’s flaxseed oil.

If you are having difficulty maintain a cholesterol level of 100mg/dl per day, you would have to limit your salmon dietary intake to just above 8 ounces of salmon per day to help keep your LDL down. The person who showed me his high result was eating over 1 pound each day.

If you are using canned salmon, don’t be fooled by the cholesterol number. Check servings per can. A 6-ounce can may read 28mg cholesterol but if that can yields 3 servings, and you have an entire can, that’s 84mg of cholesterol. 1 can of sardines may have 90mg of cholesterol. Take care of your dietary intake!

Apart from the separate LDL and HDL readings, the LDL and HDL ratio is an important risk factor. Find your Total Cholesterol number by dividing your triglyceride count by five or multiply by 20 percent (0.20). A triglyceride level of 100 mg/dl divided by five would be 20. Add that to your total HDL and LDL. These numbers should be in mg/dl units. To find your cholesterol ratio, you divide your total cholesterol number by your HDL, or good, cholesterol number. For example, if your total cholesterol number is 200 and your good cholesterol is 50, your total cholesterol ratio is 4:1. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), you should keep your cholesterol ratio at or below 5:1. The ideal cholesterol ratio is about 3.5:1. If your ratio is ideal or a little better, you are not likely to need drugs to control cholesterol levels.

There are many popular heart healthy diets to help you maintain good cholesterol levels and heart health. Many include portions of fish. While fish is a great source of necessary protein, don’t rely on it alone. Fish, by itself in large quantities, is not heart healthy. If you want extra protein, seek out servings of nuts or soy beans. These are vegetarian sources and contain no cholesterol.

There are some people, by virtue of genetics and family lineage, who have high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels. Sometimes eating heart healthy diets aren’t enough. For those, drug intervention might help but you’re fighting your DNA mix. The therapy may be worse than the initial problem. Seek out more thorough testing and monitor your heart health at least twice per year.

Fish is a source of cholesterol and shellfish may have huge levels of cholesterol. Each ounce of lobster can have 27 milligrams of cholesterol. If cholesterol monitoring is part of your heart health plan, know the cholesterol nutritive levels of your dietary intake. Juggling heart health often requires a mix of bad and good. Strive for better. Balance requires thought and responsibility.

For the most part, keeping those 5 numbers in check is a challenging quest, especially if you are not tolerant to statin drugs. Knowledge, insight, and fervor are necessary for a lifestyle diet. Choosing salmon over meat may have heart healthy benefits. Salmon cholesterol may not be totally heart healthy but it’s a heart healthier choice among animal sources.

New 2013 cholesterol guidelines

Sometimes it may be the binge eating you had before your medical exam. Other times it may be the dietary recommendations that eating chicken and fish are healthier than red meat. Any animal-source food has cholesterol. According to the Center of Disease Control, 71 million Americans or 1 in 3 have high LDL or bad cholesterol levels. LDL cholesterol is associated with lining arteries with plaque that may lead to organ damage, particularly leading to heart attacks and strokes. For some people, it is dietary, and is easily controlled. For others, these may be familial, chronic conditions. There’s no wonder why cholesterol management is a big topic and essential indicator examined on general blood tests. When the American Heart Association announces new guidelines for cholesterol management, doctors listen. The new report promotes high statin dosage to control high LDL levels.

A group of researchers from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association put their weight on new cholesterol management guidelines. Their emphasis is to increase statin treatments to more people who might be at risk of having a heart attack. The origin of these reports were designed to effectively care for those who already had some level of a cardiovascular episode.

As with all cases, the panel took a traditional approach. As with all patients, they emphasized lifestyle guidelines (i.e., adhering to a heart healthy diet, regular exercise
habits, avoidance of tobacco products, and maintenance of a healthy weight). They cited that use of one of the 4 statin groups would help those who can’t manage to keep their LDL at a normal range. They did not discuss HDL/LDL ratios.

Establishing a target range under real circumstances still remains vague but they deemed that an LDL-C of 190 is considered threatening.

The new guideline recommends moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy for these four groups:

1) Patients who have cardiovascular disease;
2) Patients with an LDL, or “bad” cholesterol level of 190 mg/dL or higher;
3) Patients with Type 2 diabetes who are between 40 and 75 years of age
4)Patients with an estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease of 7.5 percent or higher who are between 40 and 75 years of age (the report provides formulas for calculating 10-year risk).

Chronic use of statins may have negative effects on neuromuscular systems, particularly peripheral myopathies. While Cleveland University research cites that 72.5% of statin-intolerant patients may be treated with statins. There are those that have diseases like muscular dystrophy or multiple sclerosis for which statin use may be almost fatal. Recommendations of high stain dosages may be more dangerous holistically than cardiology specialists realize.

For example, many people suffer from rheumatism and fibromyalgia. These involve muscle pains, affecting over 10 million people, that have no succinct etiology to infer causality and results. There is little data to support that high-dose statins may induce more extreme pain or inflammation. While cholesterol management is vital, average cardiologists may not take these other common diseases into consideration when prescribing statin drugs.

Specialists that read these guidelines may take easier approaches at high-dosing statins to force cholesterol management to those that may not need it. The November 2013 guidelines of the American College of Cardiologists and the American Heart Association seems to sanction this. Most cardiologists adhere to the average and this report definitely targets the average. Patients are then forced to seek out cardiologists that see patients as individuals instead of group numbers. Groupings are attractive at writing presentations. Patients as clients require more specific attention.

Yet statins are touted well beyond cholesterol management with research demonstrating efficacy in treating cancer and other diseases. It’s as if all the leading drug companies that produce cholesterol are behind all the experiments. In some respects, companies like Merck and Pfizer are using cardiologists as drug pushers, especially when two major heart organizations sanction high dosages of statin medications to help lower LDL cholesterol.

I have genetic cholesterol and management requires an almost vegan diet along with exercise. Because of a form of muscular dystrophy, all statins have been proven toxic. I use Source Natural Cholesterol Complex on a daily basis, along with non-statin prescription Zetia and Lopid. Policosanol is a key ingredient in my supplement mix and policosanol research shows that 20mg can help reduce LDL cholesterol by nearly 30%. For people that suffer from statin intolerance, statins are not the conclusive treatment.

Cholesterol is only one of many indicators that may lead to heart disease. Relying on statins to lower LDL cholesterol levels may be great for many people. For those that exhibit statin intolerance, there are other routes and physicians should understand and study these.

Sifting through this 80 page document from November, it’s a rather unimpressive work and further extends that the two leading organizations continue to fail at examining holistic approaches to cholesterol management. Cholesterol levels correlate differently with age and this report didn’t cover that well. As people rise over 70, 190 to 200 LDL is more tolerable than that of a 25 year old.

Prescribing high intensity statins as a rule instead of an exception, may actually harm some patients in those groups due to side-effects. The fervent faith in statins for cholesterol management that seems to be shared by traditional cardiologists may be taking cardiovascular care in wrong directions. There must be more exploration into alternative approaches that place responsibilities on both doctor and patient.

Finding a reasonable target that I can maintain without statins is my goal. In the overall wellness mix, I prefer to be in control. Control requires an active goal-oriented approach. That control persists between routine visits to my practitioner.

Patients, as drug consumers, will accept statins and will likely not report intolerances. While statins for lowering cholesterol may be beneficial, the overall goal is to help patients (as clients) pursue healthy lifestyles and feel well. On the patient’s side, you must be willing to take necessary drug-free steps to improve your heart and cardiovascular health. Ultimately your health is your responsibility!

As to the new stricter standards proposed by the ACC and AHA regarding cholesterol borderlines and statin medications, everything and anything is subject to change. Each year new studies and interventions lead to new perspectives of how to approach cardiovascular conditions. The ACC and AHA are traditionalists and are likely to follow Statins as a holy sword. Statins are not exclusive. Seek out other options and, if possible, find integrative health centers that offer more holistic and educational approaches to help resolve what may be a chronic condition. There are lifestyle choices that can help you manage your LDL cholesterol levels.