Starch and resistant starch carbohydrates and you

Carbohydrates are classified into three subtypes: monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. They form key nutrients your body needs and your tongue craves. Excess dietary carbohydrates may lead to diabetes and weight gain. Sugar and starch are examples of many foods. The only foods without sugar or starch are meat and fish. All plants have carbohydrates. Both are pre-factors of energy fuel.

When people talk about carbohydrates, sugar comes to mind, normally sucrose, fructose, and glucose. They come from plants and a great source is sugar, derived from cane and many fruits.

Another carbohydrate is starch. Starches are long chains of the sugar glucose joined together. Starches (formerly known as complex carbohydrates) occur naturally in a large range of foods including nutrient-rich foods like root vegetables, legumes, cracked wheat, brown rice, pearl barley, quinoa and oats. As with sugar, there are many starches. There are essentially two types of starch -simple starch that are digested rapidly and resistant starch that metabolizes at a slower rate.

Resistant Starch is the subject of the latest health studies. Unlike other forms of starch, the small intestine does not digest resistant starch. Instead, it passes through and gets metabolized by the large intestine. Skipping the digestive process means that resistant starch gets turned into fuel. The fuel is then burned off quickly as energy, while some resistant starch remains to become prebiotics, food for the healthy bacteria that live in the gut.

According to Johns Hopkins Medical, Resistant starch is a carbohydrate that resist digestion in the small intestine and ferments in the large intestine. As the fibers ferment they act as a prebiotic and feed the good bacteria in the gut. There are several types of resistant starch. Food processing usually reduces the healthy effects resistant starches provide. Processing minimizes heart and body health benefits that resistant starch provides.

Foods that contain resistant starch include:
Plantains and green bananas (as a banana ripens the starch changes to a regular starch)
Beans, peas, and lentils (white beans and lentils are the highest in resistant starch)
Whole grains including oats and barley.
Cooked and cooled rice.
Seeds such as almonds, pistachios, and others that are not roasted.

There are two ways to add resistant starches to your diet — either get them from foods or take a supplement. Several commonly consumed foods are high in resistant starch. This includes raw potatoes, cooked and then cooled potatoes, green bananas, various legumes, cashews and raw oats, according to Healthline.

I don’t believe that eating resistant starch is a road to better health health. Using small portions of meats, fish, fruits complement nutritional holes and tastes as life fuels. These are the natural components for activity and endurance.

As the fuels of early civilization, grains could be dried for storage. Fruits were also dried by dehydration or preserves. Survivalists dried fish and dried meat to help make foods last longer for travel and activity. The jerky was popular for feeding soldiers centuries ago for nutrients, albeit sugars and salts at unhealthy levels.

With the absence of drinkable water, sea travelers knew to ferment grains to make whiskies and beer. They also fermented fruits into wine. These helped dilute the salty tastes of dried fish and meats.

Resistant starch foods deliver more than essentials for food if you have an active lifestyle. If you are inactive, then you can gain weight and develop sicknesses. Carbohydrate based diets are for movers and shakers but resistant starch is more enduring.

Barring pathogens from the air, preserving foods support healthy lifestyles in lock downs. Resistant starch foods may keep you healthy.

Here are resistant starch recipes to try.