Coronavirus and the Vegan Diet

Can you get coronavirus from eating a salad or vegan stew? Answer is yes. Wash your produce well and hope.

Coronavirus is the new 4-letter word that spreads like silent snipers through our planet. More people are being tested and, of those results, coronavirus is spreading. Of course, science is grappling with coronavirus by attempting to answer unanswerable questions. Are there false positives from tests? Are tests testing for the right virus? Also sneezes and coughs spread germs. Vegans, picking fruits and vegetables in produce aisles, are especially vulnerable too.

People constantly touch fruits and vegetables. They may also have colds and other seasonal infections. They squeeze items and put noses close to smell freshness, while dropping a few onto the floor.

A preliminary study published this week, used an atomizer to simulate a cough or sneeze spray of coronavirus strain. Discoveries were monitored and shared with Health institutes of University of California, Princeton University, and Center for Disease Control (CDC). The virus could be detected in the air for up to three hours after it was aerosolized with a nebulizer, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.

Ever think about the surfaces of Apples, Pears, Citrus, Celery, and other produce? Is it possible that hard apples might be stained with coronavirus for days?

In this biome of plant growth, potential edibles are subject to dust, microbes, worms, and larvae of tiny little creatures. Many vegans claim that organic foods are invulnerable due to better care. Actually, that may be untrue. Instead of ordinary pesticides, pesticides from more organic sources are used.

List of Organic Pesticides:

Bacillus Thuringiensis. Bacillus thuringiensis, more commonly referred to as Bt, is a biological pesticide, which means it is a living organism that is in some way lethal to garden or yard pests.

Beauveria Bassiana. Beauveria bassiana is a fungus that grows naturally in soils throughout the world and acts as a parasite on various arthropod species, causing white muscardine disease; it thus belongs to the entomopathogenic fungi.

Kaolin Clay. The use of Kaolin clay in the garden has been found to control insect pests and disease as well as protecting against sunburn or heat stress and may enhance fruit color too.

Neem Oil. Neem oil insecticide kills some pests after they have eaten leaves sprayed with it, while it repels others with its strong smell. Neem oil is used to control many pests, including whitefly, aphids, Japanese beetles, moth larvae, scale, and spider mites.

Pyrethrum. Pyrethrins are pesticides found naturally in some chrysanthemum flowers. They are a mixture of six chemicals that are toxic to insects. Pyrethrins are commonly used to control mosquitoes, fleas, flies, moths, ants, and many other pests. … Whole, crushed flowers are known as pyrethrum powder.

Plant Oils or Biopesticides. Oils such as lemon, orange, and anise give fruits and seeds their characteristic odor and taste. The oils are used as pesticides to repel certain animals and insects, and to kill certain insects. When used as pesticides, these oils do not present any known risks to humans or the environment.

Along with possible Coronavirus from other produce customers and staff, all these organic pesticides may coat your valued foods.

For most part, I see people washing produce for as little as 5 seconds under running water. Is this enough to remove insecticides and viruses like coronavirus? What do you think?

Vegans make it a point to wash produce thoroughly with ritualized practices. Some soak them in baking soda for 2-minutes then rinse thoroughly.

Some soak produce in Apple Cider Vinegar and rinse thoroughly. Some use ultrasonic basins or wands to sterilize the produce. Hopefully viruses like Coronaviruses go down the drain too.

Many people have seasonal colds caused by viruses. They do not respond well to antibiotics. Viruses are another microbial family. Most viral colds go away as weather warms. Viruses don’t survive in heat.

According to a new article in National Geographic, viruses that cause influenza or milder coronaviruses (yes, there are seven in total that affect humans) often subside in warmer months due to a concept called “seasonality,” or a predictable rise and fall depending on the time of year.

This coronavirus strain comes from a new side of the viral family… SARS-CoV-2. There have been reports that infectivity of SARS CoV (SARS coronavirus) was lost after heating at 56°C (132-degF) for 15 minutes but that it was stable for at least 2 days following drying on plastic, in a lab study of 2011 when a SARS flu was present. But this coronavirus (COVID-19) hasn’t been fully examined for high temperature tolerance.

There are 219 virus species that are known to be able to infect humans. The first of these to be discovered was yellow fever virus in 1901, and three to four new species are still being found every year. According to Medicine Plus, They are made of genetic material inside of a protein coating. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox, and Ebola. Different viruses attack certain cells in your body such as your liver, respiratory system, or blood. Some have been associated with cancer growth.

Current coronavirus strain still has more questions than answers. It’s spreading at a moderate but noticeable speed to impact society on many levels. Salads may be a great route to fitness. Vegetarian and vegan lifestyles deem healthy results. But you have to make certain that all produce, organic or conventional, is washed thoroughly. Based on SARS temperature range, I’d advise cooking above that tempoerature.