Vitamin E and metabolic syndrome

According to Ohio State University research, 1 out of 3 Americans may need more vitamin E to combat metabolic syndrome.

Vitamin E is an essential antioxidant that helps reduce free radicals (or sludge) from your body. Other major vitamin antioxidants include vitamins A and C. Antioxidants may come naturally from many fruits and vegetables. People in the study who drank milk along with the natural form of vitamin E absorbed between 26.1 and 29.5 percent of the vitamin, depending on their health status. Those with metabolic syndrome absorbed considerably less.

Those who have been diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome would then have to be more vigilant in taking vitamin E supplements.

Metabolic Syndrome is not just one disease or condition. It is a cluster that brings symptoms such as high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels together. Doctors believe that these symptoms are involved in increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Studies have correlated those as cofactors that may lead to those main diseases.

As an anti-oxidant, Vitamin E helps eliminate byproducts within your body for cellular and organic wellness. Lack of dietary antioxidants may result in damaging vital networks that keep your body healthier. Some studies have been investigating a vitamin E role in preventing degenerative mental imbalances such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Good thought when applying for research grants.

Dietary sources of vitamin E include: Almonds, Raw Seeds (sunflower and pumpkin), and Hazelnuts. Plant oils also have vitamin E. The benefit with these as they are high in good fats – mono- and poly-unsaturated. The downside is that excessive consumption may lead to fat elevation because these are still high in fat content.

Kale, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens and Swiss chard are low calorie vegetables that eaten raw or cooked releases vitamin E with natural co-factors that may help absorption without fats.

Foods high in antioxidants help reduce bad cholesterol levels and elevate good cholesterol levels when taken as part of an habitual diet, with minimal dietary cholesterol intake from meats and fish.

As a cluster of possible conditions, metabolic syndrome may actually have several other reasons. One is called insulin resistance that may be hereditary or dietary. Under normal conditions your digestive system breaks down many foods you eat into sugar (glucose). Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that helps sugar enter your cells to be used as fuel. People that are resistant to insulin don’t respond normally to insulin, and glucose can’t enter the cells as easily. Thus results in elevated glucose. It is a pre-diabetic condition that may likely contribute to belly fat accumulation.

Age also factors in belly fat as lean muscles tend to soften and develop fatty deposits up to 5% nearly each decade of age. By the time you reach 70, you may have lost 20% lean muscles and added belly fat.

Fats and sugars are fuels that keep your body going. Excesses often result in raising glucose levels, belly fat accumulation, and cholesterol markers.

Centuries ago, metabolic syndrome was less likely as people needed to walk and labor manually. In today’s age, fewer people walk and labor is more sedentary. Metabolic syndrome may be an adaptation to technology. Yet this adaptation may elevate risks of heart attacks, strokes, and diabetes.

Essentially, any activity after eating, dietary vigilance, and use of vitamin supplements at moderate levels will help adjust metabolism to normal levels over time. Vitamin E is only one possible factor. There are, as you see, many more. The Ohio University study only provides a glimpse of a much larger picture.

The good news is that Cow’s milk over water promotes absorption of supplemental vitamin E.