USDA MyPlate Pyramid diet plan

Are you eating right or wrong? Are you eating what you need for proper nutrition? The Unites States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a food pyramid that helps you make choices. Is it helpful? There are supporters and critics. Let’s study the USDA food pyramid and their more recent MyPlate plan.

The USDA Pyramid, developed in 1992, emphasized eating more vegetables and fruits, less meat, salt, sugary foods, bad fat, and additive-rich factory foods. There has been quite a but if research in nutrition and dietary plans since then. Also, obesity, diet-based diabetes and other health issues arose since then. No-fat diets were proven as a suspicious way to diet. In 2015, the USDA revised the pyramid approach with Choose MyPlate. The new guidelines add whole grains and varied protein sources as the correct diets for Americans to eat from 2015 to 2020:

MyPlate plan is designed to help you eat food from the 5 basic food groups
Vegetables and legumes/beans.
Fruit.
Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain and/or high cereal fibre varieties.
Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans.
Milk, yogurt cheese and/or alternatives, mostly reduced fat.

Make half your plate fruits and vegetables. Focus on whole fruits. Vary your veggies.
Make half your grains whole grains.
Move to low-fat and fat-free dairy.
Vary your protein routine.
Eat and drink the right amount for you.

Yet, the food pyramid has been around for so long. The abstract notions of the food pyramid seemed biblical but difficult to follow with reason.

The USDA food pyramid was a widely recognized nutrition education tool that translated nutritional recommendations into the kinds and amounts of food to eat each day. The Pyramid is based on USDA’s research on what foods Americans eat, nutrition, and quantity. While the USDA food pyramid has been fine all these years, the USDA updated the program to What’s On My Plate for the present and future.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created MyPlate, an easy-to-follow food guide, to help parents to figure out how to feed their kids nutritious, balanced meals. The colorful divided plate includes sections for vegetables, fruits, grains, and foods high in protein. MyPlate helps you eat on the basis of a 1600 calorie diet plan, while maintaining fullness from one meal to another. Using MyPlate approaches, variance is the key to help make meals interesting. Besides, kids (and adults) are picky (and irresponsible) consumers of food.

The USDA targets the USA diet and the bluegrass roots for outlining good meals as the core of the healthy USA eating lifestyle. It isn’t about starving. It’s about diversifying the food groups and understanding what constitutes a serving. Does this mean that those 16-ounce sirloin steaks are gone? Well….not as a habit. The My Plate theme is habit of most meals. USDA Choose MyPlate seems to make more sense than the Pyramid but is it realistic?

The Choose My Plate method helps organize meals according to the USDA dietary guidelines for basic health. It’s a more focused approach, especially if you eat at home.

While the Cover MyPlate food choices don’t account for cakes, cookies, and fried snacks, the USDA makes sure that people – young and old – can access the wholesome nutrition these meals provide. USDA Cover MyPlate meals are distributed to schools, summer camps, seniors, and depressed areas.

The Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) works to improve the health of low-income elderly persons at least 60 years of age by supplementing their diets with nutritious USDA Foods. These include hot breakfasts and lunches at day senior centers and food distribution directly to elderly with severe mobility problems. The latter usually requires registering with a neighborhood senior program for direct distribution to your door.

Since the 1960’s, under President Lyndon Baines Johnson, USA made a pledge that no USA resident should ever go hungry. While there are many fancy diets available these days targeting weight and health management, the USDA helps overwhelmingly (often incognito) to aid healthy food to the needy of the USA.

While Cover MyPlate may not include many of the advertised and marketed food and serving sizes, over the past decade nutrition has been partnering with medicine. From US Dietary Guidelines to scientific nutrition research, nutrition brings many important factors for health management and wellness.

Yet, most physicians were poorly trained in nutrition. Few medical schools offered more than 25 hours of nutrition studies. Many…zero.

Nutrition has also been associated with moods, including depression and anxiety disorders.

While the USDA MyPlate Pyramid diet plan may be basic and not exactly mouth watering, MyPlate helps provide nutrition through food to many needy individuals. While research hasn’t been vast enough to support MyPlate as an overall route to health and longevity, it’s a basis for all to begin eating healthier. Smoking, alcohol, and richer foods might be confounding variables in any study. Then there are genetic and activity issues – many undiscovered.

USDA MyPlate is a budget minded entrance to getting healthy nutrition directly from small servings of whole foods. The USDA offers many resources to help you choose whether MyPlate is suitable for you. They also provide a list of informative videos.

Click this link for a sample of a 2-week MyPlate meal example.

The USDA MyPlate diet plan wasn’t intended to help everyone reduce obesity. MyPlate was designed to provide healthy nutrition to the young, old, poor and devastated. Yet, for those seeking a healthier lifestyle, choosing a USDA MyPlate flexible diet plan may be one benefit to help bring your health to normal levels.

With USDA MyPlate plan dieting isn’t a matter of right or wrong. Like anything of value, it’s a lifestyle choice.