May psychedelics help treat mental health and PTSD

While psychedelics epitomized the culture and music of the 1960’s, drug abuse was rampant. As the sun set on the 60s, the US government ramped up its war on drugs and in 1970 President Nixon introduced the Controlled Substances Act, rendering psilocybin, mescaline, LSD and DMT illegal. About 2 weeks ago, John Hopkins School of Medicine received a 17-million dollar grant for study of psychedelics as therapy for PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, and Alzheimer’s Disease.

Included in this study is the party drug of the 1990’s – Ecstcy. Ecstasy works both as a mind-altering drug like LSD and as a stimulant like amphetamine. Chemically, ecstasy is a synthetic drug, officially known as 3-4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or “MDMA.” It is chemically similar to methamphetamine, methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), and mescaline.

Before prescription drugs, there was alchemy. Alchemy was the medieval forerunner of chemistry, based on the belief that there are four basic elements in nature: air, fire, water and earth. Pantheists used these elements as treatments and cures of sicknesses back then. Consisting of magic potions and secrecy. Now recently marijuana has been associated for relief of pain, nausea, and anorexia. In this rejuvenated plant-based society, chemistry and alchemy find that psychedelics might help treat mental health and PTSD, according to recent research in 2017 and 2018.

Connectedness is considered a key factor of psychological well-being. The authors propose that psychedelic therapy addresses a core factor of mental health – specifically connectedness – and that this is why psychedelics show promise for so many mental health diseases, including depression, addiction and anxiety.

Alchemy used consciousness potions and leaves that induced altered consciousnesses for relaxation, fevers, and undefinable ailments. They were also used for pacts of peace and alliance.

These were psychedelics. For recreation, most psychedelics were prohibited in the 1950’s, as dosages could be fatal and addictive.

According to Yale University research, published January 2020, The results of a field study of more than 1,200 people attending multi-day arts and music festivals in the United States and United Kingdom confirm previous laboratory research indicating that psychedelic substances enhance feelings of social connectedness and improve mental well-being, the authors say.

With veteran soldiers and victims of abusive PTSD, psychedelics may prove to be beneficial. Some cases of PTSD are considered untreatable. But researchers are seeing dramatic results from therapy that uses psychedelic drugs to treat PTSD, depression and addiction. Therapy involving substances like Psilocybin and MDMA, better known as ecstasy, show 80 percent success rates years after treatment.

Yet these trials are done with small and tight clinical trials. According to PubMed, ” Even with an expanding evidence base confirming safety and benefits, political, regulatory, and industry issues impose challenges to the legitimate use of psychedelics.”

Proponents of treatments with psychedelics espouse that these therapeutics also support plant life, in April 2018.

Magic mushrooms are having a therapeutic moment. In North America, at least four organizations, each with unique strategies, are working to expand access to psilocybin for anyone with mental health issues, dying or not. These groups hope to undo decades of psilocybin prohibition by removing criminal penalties for possession or cultivation, or by providing access to psilocybin in a therapist’s offices, or both.

A group of private donors has given $17 million to start the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins Medicine, making it what’s believed to be the first such research center in the U.S., and the largest research center of its kind in the world. In the absence of federal funding for such therapeutic research in people, the new center will rely on the gifts announced today to advance the emerging field of psychedelics for therapies and wellness.

Psychedelics might be an alchemy PAC that is funding research into therapeutic psychedelics. Yet, for those suffering with chronic PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorders, alchemy may be forging a reluctant friendship with the traditional medical community.

In the 1970’s and 1980’s research demonstrated that neurotransmitters were behind the causes of depression, anxiety, and others. The top 3 neurotransmitters are serotonin, nor-epinephrine, and dopamine.

Ecstasy activates these:

Dopamine—produces increased energy/activity and acts in the reward system to reinforce behaviors

Norepinephrine—increases heart rate and blood pressure, which are particularly risky for people with heart and blood vessel problems

Serotonin—affects mood, appetite, sleep, and other functions. It also triggers hormones that affect sexual arousal and trust. The release of large amounts of serotonin likely causes the emotional closeness, elevated mood, and empathy felt by those who use MDMA.

While antidepressants may target any one of these, psychedelics target all. In addition, dosing was not controlled. This often may have led to lethal consequences.

MDMA is a synthetic drug, meaning that it’s made of chemicals. It comes in colorful pills, tablets, or capsules that sometimes have cartoon-like images on them. Sometimes each pill, or batch of pills, can have different combinations of substances in the mix and cause unknown consequences.

Ecstasy is purely lab produced. Psilocybin comes from certain mushrooms. Both are illegal. Ecstasy, also called Molly or MDMA are sometimes found in dietary supplements. RollSafe’s recommended MDMA supplements. Supplements like Alpha Lipoic Acid, ALCAR, Vitamin C, Co-Q10 and some others have been shown to reduce or prevent MDMA-induced neurotoxicity in rodent studies. According to RollSafe, research based information on MDMA (Molly/Ecstasy) dosage: read why you should take less than 120 mg of MDMA per session. None were human studies and this is a shill, marketing ploy, in my opinion.

Of course, water, salt, pepper, are chemicals. Psilocybin is a phytonutrient found in a certain breed of mushrooms. Psilocybin is a hallucinogenic substance people ingest from certain types of mushroom that grow in regions of Europe, South America, Mexico, and the United States. The phtonutrient itself isn’t illegal but body conversion is. After the gut ingests and absorbs psilocybin, the body converts it to psilocyn. The hallucinogenic effects of psilocybin usually occur within 30 minutes of ingestion and last between 4 and 6 hours.

While there are no extensive studies of therapeutic effects within controlled scientific environments, there’s yet no reliability that psychedelics play significant roles in treatment of depression, anxiety, and PTSD. There have been a few smaller studies in recent years that offered hope.

The big flaws are in humans themselves. Exceeding dosages, all these drugs are abused. Also, no side-effects have been clinically shown.

It might be nice if psychedelics played significant roles in treating these common chronic ailments. Finances may be biased and skewed as the are sourced from MAPS, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies.

The Johns Hopkins grant lends a respectable medical institution, one that played an important role in isolating the first neurotransmitters. Solomon Snyder Laboratory at Johns Hopkins, cited evidence that information processing in the brain reflects communication among neurons via neurotransmitters.

Microdosing LSD and other hallucinogens and nutrition

There are foods that have tiny nutrients that occur in nature. The arguments supporting whole foods and natural diets focus on phytonutrients as factors offering more complete nutrition than vitamin supplements. Some fruits may have over 50 phytonutients, as might teas or coffees. The doses may be measured in microns, about 39 millionths of an inch. Dosage is very tiny.

Understanding a microdose is associated with opening a bag of chips and eating just one chip. Getting a slice of pizza and eating only one bite. It seems impossible. For those into microdosing LSD, the impossibilities outweigh the possibilities.

These micronutrients might be what ancients alchemists found as therapies for many ailments. For examples, pu-erh tea has phytonutients that users claim to help promote weight loss, reduce serum LDL (bad) cholesterol, and other cardiovascular conditions. Cinnamon helps stabilize sugar levels. These microdoses of natural tiny components from whole foods offer many possible health benefits. Surprisingly, some believe that microdosing LSD or microdosing magic mushrooms (containing Psilocybin as a phytonutrient) offer healthy benefits. Both are considered psychedelic hallucinogens that some believe are routine performance enhancers. Any sense here?

It’s a subtle secret of Silicon Valley and its stars, such as Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, that microdosing LSD and other hallucinogens helped activate creativity while also reducing stress. In the United Kingdom, hundreds practice microdosing LSD to their breakfastnutrition before work.

At a gathering of psychedelic enthusiasts, 4/21/2017, microdosing LSD seemed to be a hot topic.

The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies or MAPS is performing research on microdosing to assess the values of microdosing LSD with safe performance enhancement. So far, however, small studies have been inconclusive regarding safety and claims.

Unlike phytonutrients studied by nutritionists, microdosing LSD or magic mushrooms have several roadblocks for scientific study. These are controlled or illegal substances. “Street” drugs can’t be tested for purity. Another obstacle might be how microdosing is tested in a lab. Usually dosing for a subject animal suffers inaccuracies. Should microdosing LSD studies use humans over longitudinal periods? How can you render side effects.

For example, while phytonutrients found in Pu-erh tea may aid weight management and reduce bad serum cholesterol, used frequently side effects may develop. These may include mild to serious side effects such as headache, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, and muscular weakness. The muscular weakness is due to a specific phytonutrient in Pu-erh tea that resembles (or metabolizes into a statin substance. Statins are a form of drugs used to reduce cholesterol in many patients. Some people are allergic or sensitive to statins. Even the best phytonutrients have chemicals that may produce side-effects. Fortunately, these have gone through scientific testing.

According to information published by Rolling Stone magazine, microdosing LSD may be used by some to alleviate symptoms of depression, chronic fatigue, and migraines. Microdosing gained notoriety in 2011 after a book was published by the psychologist James Fadiman, titled The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide, about the potential for positive perceptual changes due to taking regular and small amounts of LSD. This practice has not been studied extensively. While serious, even dangerous, side effects have been produced by small to large doses of LSD or magic mushrooms, is microdosing LSD safe? Is it addicting?

Many are addicted to caffeine (from coffee or tea), nicotine, tar, carbohydrates, analgesics and other substances found in food. Aspirin is derived from a phytonutrient found in the bark of a willow tree in 1763. Over time, these have become common (but commonly safe) addictions.

With the popularity of microdosing LSD, people strive for more pain relief amd greater performance. People tend to abuse and overdose. Vitamins are good for you but too much of certain vitamins can lead to a vitamin overdose, which can be dangerous and, in some cases, life threatening. From 1999 to 2015 over 160,000 deaths were due to opioid prescription overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control. These prescriptions were (likely) labeled with safe dosage instructions.

People have at least one form of addiction. Do you think you do or don’t? Are you always in control? Take this test. Then add a potentially addictive drug as a microdose. Can you take just one? Attempts to control through adoptive diets often fail. Those that microdose LSD as a habit might be safer than those taking higher doses. There is no research, beyond those sponsored by psychedelics, that reliably indicate safety over time – any time! Until such time there is, relief is a personal pipe dream.

While microdosing LSD and magic mushrooms might help manage depressive symptoms, boost creative thinking, and enhance performance, the variant to achieve more may lead to overdosing. Until medical agencies in the USA and Europe approve pf microdosing LSD, seek medical help toward relieving your symptoms. There are alternatives. A licensed health counselor or physician might be more helpful.

Are hallucinogenics nutritious? Some parts of the world think so. Where science is regarded as authoritative, microdosing LSD is not.