Alzheimer disease and neurostimulation pacemaker

The powers of cognition (the ability to recognize people, places, things and relationships) are believed to take place in the frontal lobe areas of the brain. Some theorists believe that when certain areas of the frontal lobe degrade, so do the rapid access to the entire brain’s cognitive networks. New research seems to be emerging on creating digital pacemakers to stimulate those tissues of the frontal cerebral cortex that otherwise might develop Alzheimer Disease.

Cognition is about thinking and interpreting sensory perceptions – touch, see, hear, smell, and taste. We create emotional attachments to these senses and the viability of those senses off significant contributions to survival and growth. These begin at birth. Some say before birth, as evolutionary genetic markers pass along to generations.

Many people get frightened when they seem forgetful or get stuck on that tip-of-tongue phenomenon. Some fear these are signs of Alzheimer Disease. Other causes for memory problems can include aging, medical conditions, emotional problems, mild cognitive impairment, or another type of dementia.

Alzheimer Disease was once exclusively attributed to aging. It is the degradation of the ability to develop and access cognitive networks. Simply put, it isn’t. Many adults maintain cognition throughout their entire lifespans. Alzheimer disease may also form at much earlier ages. Cognition is a very lively, experimented topic. The development of Alzheimer disease and cognitive research are part of a mutually cohesive network with many branches. Can brain stimulation of certain areas improve chances of reducing or avoiding the effects of Alzheimer disease?

The use and research of brain pacemakers is less than a decade old and was originally developed to help treat Parkinson’s disease. A significant research sponsor is Michael J. Fox, a popular TV actor who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

When it comes to Alzheimer Disease, there are many memory disorders. Currently research theorists on the development of Alzheimer disease debate inferences of causality.

The problem has been that as it emerged beyond the aged norm of senility, Alzheimer’s disease was diagnosed with complete accuracy only after death, when microscopic examination of the brain reveals the characteristic plaques and tangles. This leads to questions as to why so many living people are being diagnosed with Alzheimer disease?

There has been much evidence that has shown how mice kept in a stimulated environment (vs mice in a non-stimulated environment) developed more brain tissue and neuron networks. Neurologists have been discussing that physical exercise produces BDNF or Brain-derived neurotrophic factors. BDNF, it is believed, promotes the survival of nerve cells (neurons) by playing a role in the growth, maturation (differentiation), and maintenance of these cells. It may play a role in building new neuron networks. Some studies support that BDNF increases as a result of physical exercise, aiding neuronal health. The presence of BDNF acts as a natural stimulant for certain brain areas. Since BDNF is genetic, can the reduction or absence of BDNF be behind some cognitive declines?

Cardio-exercise, REM Sleep, Antioxidants found in Coffee or Tea and Meditation help produce BDNF. Subsequently, stress, sugar, and social isolation may reduce BDNF. As such, some that are immobile or old (lacking social networks) might be developing some cognitive impairment because of lower BDNF levels.

According to BBC News,Doctors have known for some time that loneliness is bad for the mind. It leads to mental health problems like depression, stress, anxiety, and a lack of confidence. But there’s growing evidence that social isolation is connected with an increased risk of physical ill health as well. Again, stimulation helps cognitive wellness.

Use of brain pacemakers to help prevent cognitive decline is relatively new and few agree where they should be implanted. Nonetheless, Nanobioelectronics represents a rapidly developing field with broad-ranging opportunities in fundamental biological sciences, biotechnology, and medicine. Instead of referring to these as pacemakers, I prefer neuroprosthetics for monitoring and treating neurological diseases that may help resolve some of those cognitive pathologies that we only are beginning to fathom. Be it Parkinson’s, dementia (there are 4 types of dementia), aphasia, or Alzheimer disease symptoms, there are futures to behold.

There are many things that disrupt access to memories. Finding the seat to how memories are retrieved, processed and accessed is very complex and often to broad to even consider. Normal memory function involves many parts of the brain. Any disease or injury that affects the brain can interfere with memory. Amnesia, for example, might result from a physical trauma from an injury or accident. It may also develop from other causes, often undefined. Dissociative amnesia is organic and may results from a medical or psychological cause as opposed to direct damage to the brain.

There are two types of amnesia:

Anteror Grade Amnesia – Anterograde amnesia is a loss of the ability to create new memories after the event that caused the amnesia, leading to a partial or complete inability to recall the recent past, while long-term memories from before the event remains intact. In a sense, one with Anteror Grade amnesia has no short-term memory.

RetroGrade is a loss of memory-access to events that occurred, or information that was learned, before an injury or the onset of a disease. … It is not to be confused with antero-grade amnesia, which deals with the inability to form new memories following the onset of an injury or disease. One with retrograde may create new memories.

While neuroscience has made inroads at understanding the locations of where memories are stored and, possible treating amnesia. Yet, as result of research, amnesia – particularly antero-grade amnesia – was medically induced. This happened in the case of H.M.

The high incidences of cognitive loss and Alzheimer disease continue despite vast experimentation and research. Are more people being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s than before. There is a genetic marker, APOe-4, that seems to cite some evidence. Yet there are clean genes, dirty genes, and mutated genes. And nutritionists believe that this gene could be influence by dietary factors.

But is APOe-4 the only gene behind Alzheimer onset? Is there more research necessary? In the complex universe of the brain, there is obviously a vast network of questions covering nutrition, neurotransmitters, neurotransmission co factors, and infinite variables from environment and activity.

How would positive results of an APOe-4 test and scale influence one’s life, career, and state of living?

Are we dealing with Alzheimer disease, micro-stroke with cognitive decline, or other cognitive issues?

Of course many of the research experiments aren’t well funded. Perhaps some corporate donors might want to sponsor the research. Elon Musk, of Tesla and Space-X, is developing Neuralink that connects brains with computers. While Neuralink shows no ambitions to treat Parkinson or Alzheimer disease, it may stimulate other business leaders to consider possible investments.

I supported and studied frontal lobe dementia. Frontal lobe dementia does not cause memory loss, but it can exhibit cognitive and neurological problems similar to those caused by Alzheimer’s disease or stroke. The particular area of atrophy is not dissimilar between schizophrenia and dementia. Similar theorists believe that long-term memory storage may have been disaffected due to biochemical deficiencies in REM sleep. On either level, there are no clear etiologies that indicate or predetermine any causal effect of alzheimer disease type symptoms. Yet schizophrenic symptoms and dementia symptoms share some similarities that may be from a missing link between the cortex and the mid-brain memiry centers.

Genetics, diet, smoking, alcohol, substance abuse might be not highly associative to dementia. The problems involve neurotransmitters, catalysts, inhibitors, proteins, peptides, enzymes and a host of variability make us wonder ever more how this prefrontal lesion originated and its effects on memory and organized thinking.

A neurostimulation implant pacemaker therapy may be one significant approach to help suppress cognitive deficits. Using nano-electronic intervention for cognitive decline and avoiding Alzheimer disease, is a promising exploration into helping patients and families deal with cognitive decline. Whether a brain pacemaker will be a benefit is really up to further research as to where they could best stimulate possible reduction in Alzheimer disease decline. Yet, the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow may still require a series of quixotic games, puzzles, and questions to conclusively answer. We still don’t know what lies ahead. Do you?

Music memory and madness

The world is alive with the sounds of music. Babies react to sounds even before birth and that sense of hearing reaches far and wide within the brain of nearly every individual, regardless of race, ethnicity, intelligence, and politics. Music as sound is a primary language. As such, can music be associated with the integrities of memory and madness?

One of my earliest research projects studied how music may be associated with memory and madness – behavior. Those were the days when Alzheimer’s Disease was limited terminology and insurances didn’t cover cognitive disorders. New research technologies demonstrate that music may help prevent and treat memory and madness in senior populations.

In brain imaging scans, music has been shown to excite pleasure areas of the brain. Due to expenses, these studies have been very small.

According to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, the use of music as therapy shows evidence that it positively affects many behaviors and memory functions. A new, large study at the University of Wisconsin explores music and Alzheimer’s Disease effectiveness. The State of Wisconsin and the University are investing $300,000 for this study. The study is part of a Catalyst Grant program at the University. Are the simple power of sounds and music effective in reducing memory and madness?

Music therapy has been studied as being beneficial for developmental diseases such as Autism as a treatment modality but not as a cure. The music therapy for autism studies, however, have been small but yielded promising results if further investment were granted.

With a rise in senior population, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia bring memory studies to the forefront. Therapeutic interventions and successes involving music therapy with the symptoms of memory loss offer exciting research opportunities. Wisconsin’s population of those age 65 or over is slightly higher than the USA national average. The new University of Wisconsin studies may have deep impact.

Access to different music resources are friendlier as more adults use MP3 players and cellular phones. Government (and private) sponsored organizations such as Older Adults Technology Services help seniors make use of computers and download resources. Many senior centers now offer courses to learn about computer use. Access to free music is virtually limitless through websites online. At no point in history has music been as accessible as it is now. Using music as a therapy tool may deliver some extraordinary benefits.

At a university in Belfast, a rather large and long study found that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents. Studies also show that music, as a therapeutic intervention can relieve anxiety, depression in older people. Depression and anxiety may somewhat lead to cognitive impairment. There are many new studies citing evidence that music reaps many benefits for all ages.

Anesthesiologists have found that post-surgical patients listening to jazz music in the recovery room are more relaxed when researchers monitored heart rate. Is mellow jazz helpful for hospital use?

Technology can often confound other technologies. New hearing aids use special integrated sound technologies that facilitate conversations. Many older people wearing these hearing aids find that listening to MP3 music on these results in unwanted noise. You may need a simpler, older hearing aid for music listening.

Listening to loud music while driving may help you feel relaxed but studies show that it can lead to distracted driving and accidents.

Using music as therapy can be conducive as an aid in treating memory and madness issues. Much of the noted research has been published in the last two years, most in the past few months It is a growing field seeking more professionals. Of course, there are some people who simply don’t enjoy music listening. That’s what makes therapy very challenging. Music may offer no positive effects or increase anxiety even more.

Music therapy has many benefits for Alzheimer’s disease. It may help by soothing an agitated person, igniting associative memories, engage the mind even in the disease’s later stages, and improve appetite and eating in some cases. It is beneficial for symptoms of cognitive loss but it is not a cure. At best, like many drugs, it may slow progression.

So, if you remember too many tip-of-the-tongue memory losses, it may be time to schedule a cognitive assessment test with a memory healthcare professional. There are many available technologies and there are conflicting opinions about the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Sometimes, for example, it may be neurovascular episodes. Take more than one test at different centers to assure a fair and less partial diagnosis. There’s much money to be made in the business of Alzheimer’s disease.

Author William Congreve (1697) wrote:

“Music has Charms to sooth a savage Breast,
To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak.”

and brings about the question, Can music heal? More studies are focusing on music therapy as a means of treating memory and madness. Music may not be all-encompassing but, with greater availability, may prove beneficial. More large research on music therapy should be investigated.

Senior moments in memory

Ever experienced senior moments? You walk into the kitchen, open the refrigerator door, and forget what you wanted. Some people call that a senior moment. Everybody has these moments: Car keys go missing? You can’t retrieve a once-familiar name? Anybody, at any age, might experience this but if you are over 55, these incidents may become more frequent. These memory lapses are often referred as senior moments. Does this mean Alzheimer’s is setting in? Can other things be happening? Are senior moments dangerous?

Cognitive memory research delves into senior moments as possible precursors to Alzheimer Disease, a prevailing, degenerative memory condition often associated with aging. There are also incidents where Alzheimer’s may occur at younger ages. Yet research still hasn’t approached sure-fire ways of pinpointing the causes and treatments of this well publicized disease that might result in senior moments. Alzheimer’s Disease remains the most generally talked about cognitive disease, and one of the most feared.

Alzheimer’s Disease is the new name for dementia and is nicely classed into stages of memory decline. Among physicians, it’s easy to jump on senior moments as harbingers of memory decline. The diagnosis requires noticeable impairments of at least two of these categories:

•Memory
•Communication and language
•Ability to focus and pay attention
•Reasoning and judgment
•Visual perception

We will go over some of these possible symptoms. You may find that they may not be Alzheimer’s related. You may find that you can do something about them. Having many senior moments may be frightening but they may not be as threatening as you might think. They may just be very annoying.

Based on this clinical indicator, there are approximately 5.2 million Americans diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, including some under 65. Of these, nearly twice as many women are affected as men. According to the Alzheimer Association prediction, Alzheimer’s disease will soar from 5 million to 13.8 million by 2050. Those are a lot of senior moments!

Needless to say, these astounding numbers and a rapidly aging population, ignite many pharmaceutical companies to deliver Alzheimer-prevention drugs that might fend off the effects. Yet, with the very exception of some mild cases (which may or may not have Alzheimer’s), drugs may rarely help the condition.

Some of the reasons may be due to the debating probabilities of what lies behind why only some people get Alzheimer’s and many don’t. The obvious theory is genetics – it runs in the family. While certain genes and proteins have been isolated, much more research is needed. While genetics is often theorized, the vagueness of the hereditary links confound research results. That is often why genetic diseases like muscular dystrophy and multiple sclerosis are difficult to cure.

For many years, sleep research has shown evidence that sleep, particularly dreams and sleep, improve long-term memory and emotions. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter often used with skeletal muscle movement. Yet, as you dream, acetylcholine rushes up your midbrain and helps “code” memory tracts. This shift is often associated with normal sleep paralysis as the neurotransmitter moves from muscles to the frontal areas of your brain. Failure of this process may be involved in poor memory retention and organization.

In the last decade, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has identified that patients with deposits of amyloid plaque in brain areas may be the cause of cognitive irregularities in Alzheimer patients. As MRI becomes more sensitive further trials aim to see the connections. A recent Duke University study indicates plaque may lead to forms of cognitive impairment. Small MRI research has also shown that there may be other factors at play in predicting cognitive dysfunction issues. The problem of relying on MRI research is that this important tool is very expensive and large studies can’t be performed to see if these deposits might be associated with those senior moments.

One indicator of senior moments may be time and passivity. Think about games like Trivial Pursuits. Cognition often links to rich associations. That’s why most people with senior moments can still perform well at work, driving, athletics, and general life. These rich associations almost become like instinctual memories. The use of Gestalt dynamics of working memory help imprint more associations to familiar and interesting events that create attentive impressions. Is it possible that focus and attention may somehow be diffused when activity and social interactions are compromised? Can this be associated with senior moments?

More new research is revealing some exciting insights for memory enhancement but these are still at mouse level. One study, just published in Cell Journal, highlights a hormone factor that may enhance memories for life extension.

Barring other diseases, the brains plasticity grows stronger with physical activity, particularly small amounts of aerobic exercise.

Cognitive decline has been shown to slow with active social integration with friends, family, and communities. Social involvement of any kind may excite the senses that contribute to associative memory.

Maintaining creativity may also help reduce cognitive decline. Whether you are active in arts, crafts, or other things, it helps add plasticity to your brain.

The role of conscious awareness is a significant factor in reducing cognitive decline. One theory of Alzheimer’s is that a deterioration occurs in the pre-frontal cortex that reduces access to the midbrain’s memory storage called the limbic system. This area is associated with emotion and most memories are stored through likes and dislikes. These are important associations. Being consciously aware is significant at using those emotions to access memories.

Brainwashing often occurs as a means of sensory deprivation. When it comes to noticing more senior moments in life, seek out stimulation. Staying stimulated and directed may be an important tool to help avoid senior moments. Playing games on a computer or smartphone and accepting new challenges is associated with synaptic growth in neural networks. That helps memory retention.

Little known, is how many senior moments may be micro-size transient ischemic attacks or strokes that can affect parts of your brain throughout your lifespan. They may not be consciously felt but can be responsible for some senior moments. The result of these very tiny strokes over time may lead to Alzheimer symptoms. This shows that memory decline may be vascular in nature.

Few people realize that visual and hearing loss may play roles in memory decline. Possible retinopathy and other visual diseases may impair senses and contribute to memory loss. Studies also indicate the importance of hearing (listening) and learning. Having a loss of hearing may be associated with decline in memory functioning. It is one possible symptom of Alzheimer’s but may not be Alzheimer-related.

These are theories and so many other factors can help enhance or stabilize memory. When you begin noticing a higher rate of senior moments, check with your doctor. My recommendation is to seek out a major neurocognitive health facility. The depth of cognitive research and coping with preventing memory decline may offer some promising therapies. It may not be due to Alzheimer’s Disease. Not all cognitive declines may be associated with Alzheimer’s.

Senior moments and memory lapses are normal and may be found at different ages. Reasons may not be known. Hopefully, we’ll have possible treatments soon. Meanwhile, stay active and remember. Got an occasional senior moment? Don’t worry, it may be normal. Alzheimer Disease may be over-diagnosed but frequent senior moments can be very disturbing.