Beta-Glucans immune system booster in Cheerios

There’s a cute TV commercial where a little girl talks about beta-glucans and their content in each serving of Cheerios, a popular oat-based cereal. Beta-glucans are often associated with heart health, treating cancer, and as an immunity booster. Beta-glucans are a food product purported to possibly reduce bad LDL cholesterol.

It is thought that beta-glucans reduce cholesterol levels by increasing excretion of cholesterol from the digestive tract. This affects two forms of cholesterol: cholesterol from food, and, more importantly, cholesterol from the blood “recycled” by the liver through the intestines. In addition, beta-glucans in unprocessed foods may help limit the rise in blood sugar that occurs after a meal. Immune-related effects seen in studies of beta-glucans indicate observed alterations in the activity of certain white blood cells and changes in the levels or actions of substances, called cytokines, that modulate immune function.

A beta-glucan refers to a class of soluble fibers found in many plant sources. In a sense, you are what you eat. Beta-glucans are found in fiber of certain foods you (hopefully) eat. Beta-glucans are found in whole grains, particularly oats, wheat, and barley. Baker’s yeast, and certain mushrooms are also dietary sources. The FDA has allowed a Heart Healthy label claim for food products containing substantial amounts of beta-glucans. There are scientific claims that consumption of 3 grams per day of beta-glucans may result in a 5-10% reduction of LDL cholesterol in serum tests. According to Cheerios’ ad, a serving of Cheerios contains 3 grams of beta-glucans in its basic oat-based variety.

Europeans have known about how beta-glucans may play a role at reducing LDL cholesterol. They incorporate unprocessed oats and oat bran into cereals like Muesli and Granola. Oat bread is popular in some areas. For those that have mild risk levels of cholesterol, beta-glucans may play a significant normalizing role from dietary sources. Does that mean that eating more oats will reduce LDL levels in moderately high cholesterol levels?

Multiple servings of ready-to-eat oat cereals may not provide enhanced health effects. Other ingredients (added sugars, for example) and processing may actually present negative cofactors. Studies cite evidence that oatmeal provides greater satiety of appetite than ready-to-eat cereals like Cheerios. Also, many ready-to-eat cereals add unnecessary sugars and flavors to make them marketable to general market consumption. These can collide against any possible benefits beta-glucans provide. Monitoring glycemic-index at breakfast meals aids energy throughout the day and diet is a part of managing cholesterol. Food technologists are working to help enhance the benefits of beta-glucans in a wider range of foods.

For improving total and LDL cholesterol, studies have found benefit with beta-glucans at doses ranging from 3 to 15 grams daily. There appears to be no effect on HDL.

Yet, for all this possible benefit as a healthy dietary resource for heart healthier approaches to managing cholesterol and sugar levels, diets higher in beta-glucans may also pose danger and risks. Beta-glucan, as a substance widely present in foods, if taken in high doses through dietary supplements may do more harm than benefit. If beta-glucans can stimulate the immune system, harmful effects are at least theoretically possible in people that have overactive immune systems. These include multiple sclerosis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and hundreds of other conditions. To what extent may be unclear. Beta-glucans may be contributing variables.

In addition, beta-glucans are somewhat related with beta-amyloids. Beta-amyloids, some suspect, may be precursors of cognitive disorders, such as the infamous Alzheimer Disease. From food, beta-glucans prove safe. Abused supplementation has not been studied but theoretically might be a bridge to neurocognitive disorders. Then again, the relationship between glucans and amyloids haven’t really been studied to draw any conclusions. It is very speculative.

In the USA, and other parts of the world, sowing oats is part of an important farming culture. It is connected to longevity and a well life. Beta-glucans, phytonutrients in the grain, may be why people who have balanced diets with oats as part of a daily routine may be healthier. There are many articles about longevity that stress lifestyle diets.

World peace may never be achievable. Vascular wellness may be possible without resorting to medicinal drugs. Eating foods with beta-glucans may help you reach a healthy age of 100, unless something else confounds the picture. Having beta-glucans in your diet might be good for you! Isn’t it time to eat your oats today?

New 2013 cholesterol guidelines

Sometimes it may be the binge eating you had before your medical exam. Other times it may be the dietary recommendations that eating chicken and fish are healthier than red meat. Any animal-source food has cholesterol. According to the Center of Disease Control, 71 million Americans or 1 in 3 have high LDL or bad cholesterol levels. LDL cholesterol is associated with lining arteries with plaque that may lead to organ damage, particularly leading to heart attacks and strokes. For some people, it is dietary, and is easily controlled. For others, these may be familial, chronic conditions. There’s no wonder why cholesterol management is a big topic and essential indicator examined on general blood tests. When the American Heart Association announces new guidelines for cholesterol management, doctors listen. The new report promotes high statin dosage to control high LDL levels.

A group of researchers from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association put their weight on new cholesterol management guidelines. Their emphasis is to increase statin treatments to more people who might be at risk of having a heart attack. The origin of these reports were designed to effectively care for those who already had some level of a cardiovascular episode.

As with all cases, the panel took a traditional approach. As with all patients, they emphasized lifestyle guidelines (i.e., adhering to a heart healthy diet, regular exercise
habits, avoidance of tobacco products, and maintenance of a healthy weight). They cited that use of one of the 4 statin groups would help those who can’t manage to keep their LDL at a normal range. They did not discuss HDL/LDL ratios.

Establishing a target range under real circumstances still remains vague but they deemed that an LDL-C of 190 is considered threatening.

The new guideline recommends moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy for these four groups:

1) Patients who have cardiovascular disease;
2) Patients with an LDL, or “bad” cholesterol level of 190 mg/dL or higher;
3) Patients with Type 2 diabetes who are between 40 and 75 years of age
4)Patients with an estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease of 7.5 percent or higher who are between 40 and 75 years of age (the report provides formulas for calculating 10-year risk).

Chronic use of statins may have negative effects on neuromuscular systems, particularly peripheral myopathies. While Cleveland University research cites that 72.5% of statin-intolerant patients may be treated with statins. There are those that have diseases like muscular dystrophy or multiple sclerosis for which statin use may be almost fatal. Recommendations of high stain dosages may be more dangerous holistically than cardiology specialists realize.

For example, many people suffer from rheumatism and fibromyalgia. These involve muscle pains, affecting over 10 million people, that have no succinct etiology to infer causality and results. There is little data to support that high-dose statins may induce more extreme pain or inflammation. While cholesterol management is vital, average cardiologists may not take these other common diseases into consideration when prescribing statin drugs.

Specialists that read these guidelines may take easier approaches at high-dosing statins to force cholesterol management to those that may not need it. The November 2013 guidelines of the American College of Cardiologists and the American Heart Association seems to sanction this. Most cardiologists adhere to the average and this report definitely targets the average. Patients are then forced to seek out cardiologists that see patients as individuals instead of group numbers. Groupings are attractive at writing presentations. Patients as clients require more specific attention.

Yet statins are touted well beyond cholesterol management with research demonstrating efficacy in treating cancer and other diseases. It’s as if all the leading drug companies that produce cholesterol are behind all the experiments. In some respects, companies like Merck and Pfizer are using cardiologists as drug pushers, especially when two major heart organizations sanction high dosages of statin medications to help lower LDL cholesterol.

I have genetic cholesterol and management requires an almost vegan diet along with exercise. Because of a form of muscular dystrophy, all statins have been proven toxic. I use Source Natural Cholesterol Complex on a daily basis, along with non-statin prescription Zetia and Lopid. Policosanol is a key ingredient in my supplement mix and policosanol research shows that 20mg can help reduce LDL cholesterol by nearly 30%. For people that suffer from statin intolerance, statins are not the conclusive treatment.

Cholesterol is only one of many indicators that may lead to heart disease. Relying on statins to lower LDL cholesterol levels may be great for many people. For those that exhibit statin intolerance, there are other routes and physicians should understand and study these.

Sifting through this 80 page document from November, it’s a rather unimpressive work and further extends that the two leading organizations continue to fail at examining holistic approaches to cholesterol management. Cholesterol levels correlate differently with age and this report didn’t cover that well. As people rise over 70, 190 to 200 LDL is more tolerable than that of a 25 year old.

Prescribing high intensity statins as a rule instead of an exception, may actually harm some patients in those groups due to side-effects. The fervent faith in statins for cholesterol management that seems to be shared by traditional cardiologists may be taking cardiovascular care in wrong directions. There must be more exploration into alternative approaches that place responsibilities on both doctor and patient.

Finding a reasonable target that I can maintain without statins is my goal. In the overall wellness mix, I prefer to be in control. Control requires an active goal-oriented approach. That control persists between routine visits to my practitioner.

Patients, as drug consumers, will accept statins and will likely not report intolerances. While statins for lowering cholesterol may be beneficial, the overall goal is to help patients (as clients) pursue healthy lifestyles and feel well. On the patient’s side, you must be willing to take necessary drug-free steps to improve your heart and cardiovascular health. Ultimately your health is your responsibility!

As to the new stricter standards proposed by the ACC and AHA regarding cholesterol borderlines and statin medications, everything and anything is subject to change. Each year new studies and interventions lead to new perspectives of how to approach cardiovascular conditions. The ACC and AHA are traditionalists and are likely to follow Statins as a holy sword. Statins are not exclusive. Seek out other options and, if possible, find integrative health centers that offer more holistic and educational approaches to help resolve what may be a chronic condition. There are lifestyle choices that can help you manage your LDL cholesterol levels.

Control Carbohydrates with Cinnamon and Chromium

You are what you eat. Carbohydrates play large roles in most diets around the world. In countries where people are less active, these carbohydrates may lead to many averse health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. Carbohydrates are addictive. It’s very hard to eliminate use every day. Are there ways to control carbohydrates that are easy and effective?

Among the problems of today’s American diet are the necessity to focus on processed grain-based foods, such as breads, noodles, and pastas. These are rich in carbohydrates. Your body, through the pancreas, releases insulin to metabolize them. Most of these processed foods are full of simple sugars and starches that help boost energy quickly. Consequently, if you start sitting or doing relatively inactive work, the remaining carbs turn to fat. There are two mediators for this process and are available as supplements – Cinnamon and Chromium. These two haven been proven to be helpful to control carbohydrates in normal diets.

According to research, keeping blood sugar in check does everything from enhancing weight and fat loss and decreasing appetite to warding off several chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, etc. In contrast, foods that are rapidly digested and quickly released into the blood promote overeating, obesity, insulin resistance, and other metabolic disturbances contributing to disease. Nutritional Chromium is a carbohydrate stabilizer but many do not get enough from foods. Fortunately, most multiple vitamins may include Chromium as an essential mineral. The big surprise is that Cinnamon (sticks or powder), a spice found in most grocery supermarkets, is also effective with metabolizing carbohydrates.

A review of studies cite varied evidence that cinnamon may play a role with certain forms of sugar metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes.

Ironically, cinnamon offers about 8 grams of carbohydrates per tablespoon serving. Somehow, though, it is an effective method to control carbohydrates.

Cinnamon is a common spice, often used in baking, cereal. coffee, and other foods as a flavoring. It has a semi-sweet taste. Taking a cinnamon supplement can help speed up the metabolism of carbohydrates and moderate your craving for more throughout the day. Cinnamon (according to nutrition belief) may be beneficial for stabilizing your blood sugar; also helpful with suppressing fatigue by giving you energy. Cinnamon increases the stabilizing effect of insulin while reducing insulin resistance. It does this by:

1) Activating the enzymes to stimulate insulin receptors.

2) Helps with blood sugar is by enhancing the effects of insulin-signaling pathways in your skeletal muscle tissue.

3) Cinnamon contains natural flavonoids antioxidants which enhance insulin sensitivity. This makes more of your blood glucose enter the cells where it belongs; helping your levels to stabilize which in turn stops inflammation and ends your carbohydrate cravings.

Use of Chromium also aids in the metabolism of carbohydrates. According to research, chromium studies cite evidence that it may even be beneficial in controlling type-2 diabetes that is becoming more common in the USA.

Key functions of chromium:
1) Helps insulin facilitate the entrance of glucose into your cells and is a requirement for energy.

2) May influence cholesterol levels by improving its metabolism.

3) Is crucial to blood sugar and cholesterol metabolism and has become popular in weight loss programs. You can use chromium to support glucose metabolism if you have diabetes or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

As an alternative approach to dealing with hyperglycemia and e3levated cholesterol issues, chromium picolinate and GTF chromium may play supportive roles in treatment of certain diabetes cases. If you are diabetic, and you are concerned with chronic use of traditional medications, you are advised to consult with your doctor or a certified nutritionist before following a chromium regimen that may require higher doses. Supplemental chromium may definitively aid those who want to control carbohydrates on a routine basis.

There are several types of chromium supplements available, such as chromium chloride, chromium polynicotinate (GTF Chromium) and chromium picolinate. Chromium picolinate is remarkably stable and remains intact for several hours in synthetic gastric juice. The comparative data results of chromium picolinate versus other forms of chromium demonstrated that it is the most effective form to facilitate glucose control. It was also observed that chromium picolinate is better absorbed physiologically (2.5%) than chromium chloride (0.5-1%) and chromium acetate (0.8%); chromium oxide is not absorbed at all (0.001%). Effective doses seem to be in the range of 200 to 600 micrograms (0.2 to 0.6 mg) but, again, please consult your physician or certified nutritionist prior to beginning a routine supplement regimen.

Cinnamon, or rather one of the constituents of cinnamon, has been shown to be helpful at controlling the onset of Alzheimer Disease, a rising neuro-cognitive condition. Most of these cinnamon Alzheimer studies are in the animal phase.

Controlled doses of cinnamon has been shown to have some positive effect on menstrual cycles among some women suffering with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). So…in addition to cinnamon’s ways to control carbohydrates, it is seen as a possible wonder drug in other diseases and conditions. It’s possible that early alchemists used cinnamon medicinally.

Cinnamon has been used as a flavor enhancing spice for thousands of years. People sprinkle cinnamon in coffee, tea, and cereals. Cinnamon is found in cookies and cakes. The amounts of cinnamon used in recipes are generally small. No negative side effects were ever reported. Therapeutic doses of cinnamon are much higher. These higher doses of cinnamon in capsule form have not really been tested for effects by scientific scrutiny.

One of the flavonoids found in cinnamon is Coumarin. High doses of Coumarin have been shown to negatively effect the liver with chronic use. Many sources of cinnamon have low levels of Coumarin but one form, Cassia cinnamon, has higher levels. It’s important to find the source of the cinnamon when used for therapy.

Subsequently, a recent study in Finland has provided evidence that Coumarin has possible anti-inflammatory effects when used as an ingredient. Consequently, the anti-coagulant properties of Coumarin are used in blood-thinning drugs that can have serious side effects. Taking huge doses of Cassia cinnamon may be beneficial in some ways and dangerous in others. So when you want to control carbohydrates in your diet, it is very advisable to discuss capsule dosages with a certified nutritionist.

Among exercisers, Chromium is the essential element that helps promote endurance and is included in relatively high doses in performance supplements. Chromium is believed to control carbohydrates by aiding protein to build muscle mass, though there is little scientific support for Chromium as an ergogenic. At best, Chromium might help regulate the carbohydrate stream to muscles, allowing for a stream of continued energy through a workout.

According to Dr. Andrew Weil, Chromium is a major and essential aspect to control carbohydrates in the metabolism of sugar. He also believes that Chromium may help raise HDL (good cholesterol) levels and improve heart health. He estimates that up to 50% of people in the United States may be deficient in Chromium and can account to higher development of diabetes and certain metabolic syndromes that people complain about. Chromium is found in small quantities in foods such as brewer’s yeast, calf liver, whole grains, processed meats and cheese. Supplementation is recommended.

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, “As many as 90% of American diets are low in chromium, but it’s rare to be truly deficient in chromium. The elderly, people who do a lot of strenuous exercise, those who eat a lot of sugary foods, and pregnant women are most likely to be deficient in chromium. Low chromium levels can increase blood sugar, triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood), cholesterol levels, and increase the risk for a number of conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease.” As a possible side effect, overdosing on Chromium may There are some reports that chromium may make depression and anxiety or schizophrenia worse, although other reports suggest it helps depression. As with all supplements in the United States, further research is necessary.

Dietary intakes of chromium cannot be reliably determined because the content of the mineral in foods is substantially affected by agricultural and manufacturing processes. Based on supplement absorption through capsules, the general opinion is that 200 micrograms of Chromium per day is considered safe for most non-diabetic people.

WebMD indicates “that taking excessive chromium supplements can lead to stomach problems and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Too much chromium from supplements can also damage the liver, kidneys, and nerves, and it may cause irregular heart rhythm. But side effects from taking chromium supplements are rare.” Antacids inhibit Chromium absorption.

Cinnamon and Chromium help control carbohydrates. When used responsibly, they may provide many health promoting results. Keep in mind that high-dosing either of these in lieu of following a responsible, balanced diet will confound your dietary goals and ambitions. Research is expanding on Chromium and Cinnamon and their association with controlling and treating other diseases. Common and inexpensive, these two supplements may be perfect for the low-to-moderate carb addicts that comprise most people in the USA. Because cinnamon is a common food additive, adding and using it in healthy recipes may help curb that addiction.

Cholesterol management without statins

If you have elevated bad cholesterol levels, doctors choose statins as a prescription for healthy levels. The side effects are duly noted but few read them and, in some cases, intolerance to this drug is worse than its benefits. For those people, cholesterol management without statins is necessary. There are a variety of drugs that can help you manage your cholesterol levels. There are also many nutritional supplements.

Statins may weaken your muscles and cause digestive problems in some patients. The drugs, Lipitor, Zocor, and Crestor may also elevate liver enzymes and result in liver damage over time. Those with diseases like muscular dystrophy should avoid statins altogether.

Read Yeast Rice is a nutritional supplement that has had considerable proof of managing LDL levels but this also metabolizes as a type of statin. Nonetheless if you are statin sensitive you may experience some muscle pains.

Pur’erh tea has also been shown to help with weight loss and cholesterol management. Later studies demonstrated that it also metabolizes as a statin.

My advice is to temper use of Red Yeast Rice and Pur’erh if you are statin sensitive. While they are weaker than a typical dose of Crestor, accumulated effects may cause problems for those with statin intolerance.

Niacin is proven to help raise good cholesterol (HDL) levels and help lower triglycerides. You need excesses of 500mg to be effective, possibly 1 to 2 grams daily. Niacin has a nasty side effect of causing you to itch. Buffered Niacin doesn’t but does not have cholesterol management effects either. Slo-Niacin offers cholesterol management along with reduced “flushing” effects.

Policosanol is another popular supplement for cholesterol management and has no known side effects.

Use of Plant Sterols also have beneficial total cholesterol management properties. Beta-Sitosterol is part of this class of plant sterols that have demonstrated cholesterol reduction.

Now the problem of using nutritional supplements is that you need to take many pills a day instead of one. It takes a lot of discipline.

One note to understand is if you have high HDL of greater than 100 and your ratio of LDL and HDL is less than 3:1, even a slightly elevated total may not require management. Those with genetic high cholesterol may benefit from these supplements.

There are lots of natural cholesterol management types but they really need to be practical.

Remember that only meats and fish (seafood) add dietary cholesterol. You don’t find it in plants.

Visit your doctor twice a year for testing and find out your scores. That way you can target your cholesterol management without statins.