Where have all other diseases gone in pandemic

The 2020 pandemic is altering many lifestyles but people are adapting 50% or so. Well…masks and social distancing aren’t taken seriously. Amidst this pandemic, a group of medical doctors did a review that there appears to be a trend that many diseases are significantly reduced. Is there real evidence to support this? Anyone know where those diseases went?

Flu attacks respiratory and circular weaknesses. Coronavirus-19 and its variants seem to do a very good job. Where have other deaths gone? Are they being overshadowed by the pandemic from CoVid-19?

A new study in Journal of American Medical Association (8/2/20), observed: in Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina, decreases in emergency department visits ranged from 41.5% in Colorado to 63.5% in New York, with the most rapid rates of decrease in visits occurring in early March.

This notes significant trends that fewer patients are being attended for non-COVID as emergencies or as admissions during the pandemic over 5 months.

It is estimated that 5 – 20% of people in the United States and 10% of Europeans are infected with influenza each year during flu season; globally resulting in about 3-5 million severe cases and 250,000-500,000 deaths every year.

2020 is one of several pandemic crises. It’s just 103 years from one of the biggest after World War I. The horrific scale of the 1918 influenza pandemic—known as the “Spanish flu”—is hard to fathom. The virus infected 500 million people worldwide and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims—that’s more than all of the soldiers and civilians killed during World War I combined. Some are covered in annual flu vaccines. Descendants of the 1918 influenza virus still circulate today, and current seasonal influenza vaccines provide some protection against the 1918 virus.

Coronavirus-19 is a flu that potentially attacks people with chronic respiratory diseases and vascular issues. A flu is contagious. This tiny virus is lingering and reproducing better versions to make a pandemic valid. In flu seasons, getting a flu is common. This coronavirus is a flu but seems more complex and frightening. It’s cause for biggest pandemic in history.

Where have all the diseases gone in this pandemic?

There are upper respiratory infections and lower respiratory infections. Viruses enjoy lingering and attaching to healthy cells. Common cold and digestive issues reveal body malfunctions. Organisms gain entry to the respiratory tract by inhalation of droplets and invade the mucosa. Epithelial destruction may ensue, along with redness, edema, hemorrhage and sometimes an exudate (a mass of cells and fluid that has seeped out of blood vessels or an organ, especially in inflammation). Like any body irregularity, inflammation partners, and exudation may mean good news or bad news.

Hard to determine. These States are very different with varying lifestyles and per-capita statistics. Studies are done to answer or refute questions.

Did patients have fewer heart attacks and strokes in this period due to lifestyle changes stemming from the pandemic? Or did rates stay constant, with more people suffering at home instead of coming into the emergency room because of the pandemic?

During the pandemic and lockdown measures, coronavirus-19 may have substituted for other chronic disease diagnoses. So people with bad cold symptoms might have been seen as susceptible to coronavirus flu.

While there are health pandemics in the USA about every couple decades, none of those pandemics are as lifestyle redefining as coronavirus-19, without any durable vaccines that have been thoroughly tested under neutral empirical standards.

People tend to be glib about common colds that may include acute flu strains and viral infections. Testing was less relevant as symptoms faded within weeks. So colds could have been bacterial or viral. Masks, gloves, and distancing would have been wise choices to filter microbial transmission. Glib attitudes among doctors, people, employers, and affordable health care never were really sensitive to poossible repiratory infectons on-the-go.

According to the CDC,uncomplicated influenza signs and symptoms typically resolve after 3-7 days for the majority of people, although cough and malaise can persist for more than 2 weeks, especially in elderly people and those with chronic lung disease. People with flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Orthodox medicine suggests that masks, gloves, handwashing help reduce likeliness of getting the flu. Yet the coronavirus behind the 2020 pandemic is a new form of virus microbe that is also mutating to form newer variants. That means our bodies have not seen this virus before and we are unlikely to have any antibodies.

In common cold flu no tests are given by practice. Most doctors prescribe antibiotics. If a virus infection is the untested cause, antibiotics are abused. Antibiotics do not work against viruses; they only work on bacterial infections. Antibiotics do not prevent or treat coronavirus disease (COVID-19), because COVID-19 is caused by a virus, not bacteria.

During this 2020 pandemic, moles become mountains. The length and the severity of the pandemic foster disobedience of not wearing masks and social distancing properly. CDC estimates that influenza was associated with more than 35.5 million illnesses, more than 16.5 million medical visits, 490,600 hospitalizations, and 34,200 deaths during the 2018–2019 influenza season.

The limited scope of the JAMA trend analysis study basically diminishes other respiratory and congestive diseases to lower importance. Few die of artery and breathing diseases because coronavirus is dominant in thoughts and minds.

Older people are subjects to other diseases, contagious or not. Adding coronavirus to the series during a pandemic makes medicine and science more confusing. Where have all those diseases gone? They’re there. Hidden in deaths.

JAMA’s numbers are incorrect. The real numbers are accidentally hidden. Globally, for seasonal influenza, the WHO estimates the mortality rate is usually below 0.1%. However, the WHO also notes that mortality is “to a large extent determined by access to and quality of healthcare”. When this pandemic fades to memories, the numbers of hospital admissions will return to what they were before 2020. That is…until the next pandemic shows up. It’s likely.

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