Carbonated water seltzer and teeth

For all the unhealthy issues thrown at the soda industry and USA consumption, now seltzer may be considered a variable promoting tooth enamel erosion.

Seltzer is water that goes through a triple filtration process and then adds carbonation for those bubbles. Like water, 0 calories and 0 sugars or non-sugars. That’s what makes it seltzer or carbonated water.

Doctors and nutritionists will then discuss research claims that seltzer upsets calcium absorption, destroys tooth enamel, and contributes to weight gain.

While soda manufacturers do manufacture and sell seltzer, some are behind the small, ineffective studies that might claim that seltzer is healthy or unhealthy for this, that, and those. In one study, comparing seltzer against water consumption for a 15 day period. Those who drank carbonated water had significant improvements in digestive symptoms, constipation and gallbladder emptying, Carbonated water has benefits for digestion. It may improve swallowing, increase feelings of fullness and reduce constipation.

What revelations! For over 100 years, seltzer has been used as a health-promoting media (along with Aspirin) in Bromo Seltzer and Alka Seltzer.

Now HESCA (Health Smart Choice Advocates) concludes (October 2017) that, “Based on a number of different research studies on different kinds of water, seltzer water does have a variety of different great benefits that people should take advantage of.”

The core idea is hydration is a health necessity. Water accounts for 60 percent of your body and feeds each cell throughout your physiological system. It helps improve cardiovascular health, hypertension, and more. Water is an active agent:

1) Increases Energy & Relieves Fatigue
2) Promotes Weight Loss
3) Flushes Out Toxins
4) Improves Skin Complexion
5) Maintains Regularity
6) Boosts Immune System
7) Natural Headache Remedy
8) Prevents Cramps & Sprains

The only thing I can state is that uncarbonated water is in the state that your body uses. Carbonated water has to go through a digestive process. Either will hydrate. Generally, that process filters out the carbolic acid and carbon to convert it to water.

Perhaps the error from most is that any liquid is a substitute for water. That’s the water in coffee, milk, or juice. That really isn’t the case. That is why water and seltzer are necessary for promoting health. Something to sing about!

When it comes to fake research, the media will jump on any tiny study. Then rumors spread. Whether still or carbonated, seltzer and water are almost clones. Still water moves more rapidly when you are dehydrated.

If your active, still water is a better thirst quencher than seltzer. When you aren’t, seltzer is a great alternate beverage.

As far as eroding tooth enamel, there are many foods and drinks that may do that. Try cans of Pepsi or Coke – with either sugar or sucralose. Sucralose has chlorine in its formula.

HPV Men kissing deadly

Increased TV viewing of HBO, Netflix, and other subscription channels may be more likely to engage in emulating some of those passionate and kinky sex scenes. There has been a barrage of complaints that Game of Thrones has significantly reduced sex scenes in later seasons. Is it possible that reflective passion and sex scenes might increase possible cancers and gum diseases? A salivary virus, HPV, might make your next kiss a deadly one. HPV is an STI transmitted by oral and genital sex – including kisses.

Actor Michael Douglas has been a spokesperson at highlighting the human papilloma virus or HPV as possibly the number one cause of mouth and throat cancer.

Is it possible that deep kissing and oral sex might result in head or neck cancer? A recent research study hints that it might be true. Two variables found in saliva, especially men’s saliva, are HPV and HSV. The latter has been linked to possible STD (herpes). HSV-1 and HSV-2 are transmitted through direct contact, including kissing, sexual contact (vaginal, oral, or anal sex), or skin-to-skin contact. HPV is becoming more prevalent in male saliva, among 1 in 9, and that may lead to cancer of varying types.

higher likelihood of developing cancer of the oral and neck areas. Are women off the hook? Transmission of two HPV types (16 and 18) cause 70% of cervical cancers and precancerous cervical lesions, that can spread to nearby areas.

Papillomaviruses are a diverse group of DNA-based viruses that infect the skin and mucous membranes of humans and a variety of animals. Evidence is mounting that HPV might be a contributing agent.

There have been studies of HPV presence and the development of gum disease. Results have been generally weak linking HPV and periodontitis. This correlation is due to HPV and its interaction with soft tissue and mucosal membranes. Anecdotally, dentists show some concern that oral sex positively correlates with potential gum disease development.

HPV infection is extremely common and more statistics and research is targeting HPV. Most sexually active people will be infected with HPV at some point in life. Fortunately, there are available vaccines that help a virtual elimination of HPV. So far, they help prevent infections with HPV types 16 and 18, two high-risk HPVs that cause about 70% of cervical cancers and an even higher percentage of some of the other HPV-associated cancers (9, 10). Gardasil also prevents infection with HPV types 6 and 11, which cause 90% of genital warts.

Of course, few routine medical exams and tests search for HPV presence, unless you ask specifically. The current Affordable Care Act does cover HPV testing and vaccination. The HPV vaccines for the recommended age groups of males and females, Pap tests, and HPV testing for women are all covered under this policy. It should be noted that the ACA is subject to change.

Fundamentally, while semi-graphic TV sex scenes on TV might induce foreplay, does thought come into consideration when you “make love” to a new partner spontaneously about HPV. In the US it is estimated that 52% of unintended pregnancies result from couples not using contraception in the month the woman got pregnant. Considering the cancer potential when “French kissing” or oral exploration may be a comparable danger. Would you kiss your toilet seat?

While HPV is known in several medical circles, were you aware whether your body fluids contained HPV? Sometimes a kiss can be deadly, even from someone you love. Or to someone you love (or just like). Routine medical exams are helpful but, as relationships go, if french kissing is a form of oral sex, you might become a victim. Even though it was just a kiss.

Do you know if you have HPV?