Hyperhidrosis a sweating topic

Feeling the heat? Sweating is a bodily function that helps regulate your body temperature. Also called perspiration, sweating is the release of a salt-based fluid from your sweat glands. When people sweat a bit more than others or regularly, there is a medical condition called hyperhidrosis. Some company is advertising supplements for treating hyperhidrosis. Think you need it? Try a doctor first!

Hyperhidrosis seems like a fancy euphemism to the phrase, “Sweating Like a Pig”. Pigs don’t sweat. They wallow in mud to keep their bodies cool. Sweating is a normal human response to environmental heat and activity. These are two stressors that can heat your body. Sweating is a natural response to help regulate balance temperature within your body for health maintenance.

There are usually about 3-million sweat glands distributed in your body’s skin. Sweat glands release moisture as a salt-water solution. Sweat glands are small organs under the skin that produce sweat. They are somewhat like nerve receptors that respond to touching, pressing, and other skin sensations. Secreting water and electrolytes, sweat glands use sweat to help cool the surface of the skin and reduce body temperature to a normal. Because sweat glands are under your skin, virtually every part of your body may release perspiration (sweat) but a few areas are more prone to do so than others.

About 3% of US population suffer from excessive sweating.

According to Medscape, Hyperhidrosis, is sweating in excess of that required for normal thermo-regulation.

Just because you are prone to sweating doesn’t mean you have hyperhidrosis. Part of sweat many roles may be to get you to pause and stop what you’re doing or drink water to cool your body. It acts as an alert that you may be driving yourself too hard against heat and activity challenges.

While hyperhidrosis may be a sweating topic, taking oral supplements may not be advisable. That’s why some people use body deodorant or antiperspirant over-the-counter products. While antiperspirants may help control sweat, one of the ingredients (an aluminum compound) was linked as a suspect of leading to cancer. Of course, it was once believed that aluminum products may have been linked to Alzheimer’s Disease development but this has never been conclusively proven.

Hyperhidrosis may be tested by a physician from blood tests, a litmus paper test, or through radiology. The question to ask is whether your (over) sweating might be linked to something else? There are many tests.

A doctor may test for hyperhidrosis in a blood test. As a symptom hyperhidrosis is associated with an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If this isn’t valid, a physician might try a clinical test called a Thermoregulatory Sweat Test (TST) as excessive sweat may be part of results from certain autonomic and neurological disorders. Far simpler is an iodine starch test for hyperhidrosis. Yet this test might detect a presence but is not clinically useful for quantifying the degree of hyperhidrosis. Then the cause might be skin conductance that may be associated to certain areas, genetics, heart rate, hypertension and more.

There are actually about 72 possible reasons for those suffering with excessive sweating in various areas.

The common ones are from the skin, especially the head and hands. The axilla (also, armpit) is the area on the human body directly under the joint where the arm connects to the shoulder.Other less observed areas might be the groin and back areas. As sweat glands are really in the skin, moisture might be felt anywhere.

While sweating might be symptomatic of certain health and body conditions, sweating is often normal when your body is physically stressed. The degree really depends on your healthy physical condition.

There are few solutions, other than lifestyle changes and stress reduction therapy, to clinically diagnosed hyperhidrosis. Some physicians discuss surgical methods, if hyperhidrosis is severely impinging on your living conditions.

While alchemists and herbologists may come up with supplements that may help reduce sweating excessively, many have not been approved or tested by the US Food and Drug Administration.

The common causes of excessive sweating are:

Obesity
Pregnancy
Hyperthyroidism
Menopause
Anxiety
Hypoglycemia
Certain prescriptions
Certain illegal drugs
Withdrawals from drugs or alcohol
Certain infections (like TB, HIV)
Parkinson’s disease
Blood or bone marrow disorders such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Gout
Diabetes
Tumor
Mercury poisoning
Lymphatic Infection
Endocrine Infection
Genetics

Trying to narrow it down can be expensive and fruitless. For the most part, hyperhidrosis is one of those wonderful and multiple medical terms that may have no clear identifiable cause. Routine blood testing might infer some causality but no clear cures.

Hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating has been around for many years, not exclusively to humans. Sweating is a natural response to activity or other stressors.

Should you seek help? Find an integrative doctor or a registered nutrition consultant. Keep your body cool and wear appropriate sweat-resistant clothes. Sweating is key to survival. Some actually appreciate the pheromones that some sweating produces.

Anything to excess beyond your threshold is uncomfortable. Excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis in any area could result with anxiety. As a (your) normal body process, the remedy is often provocative of more anxiety and emotional discomfort. Purchase an antiperspirant and use it wisely. Drink water (not soda) in hot weather conditions. Experiment with baby powder and drinking sage tea.

Not sweating at all is more dangerous than excessive sweating. Hyperhidrosis is an excessive sweating topic but, at 3% of the population, it means you’re not average but sweaty people find intimacy, work, and social lives. Hyperhidrosis (or excessive sweating) does not impinge on normal living. It might be a side-effect of something else that is worth investigating. Usually, the connection might be only skin deep.

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