Muscular Dystrophy and Protein

It was believed that muscle weakness resulted from poor nutrition. In many countries protein isn’t part of traditional diets. The problem is that many of the inhabitants had good muscle performance. Muscular dystrophy causes muscle weakness. Is there a link in Muscular Dystrophy and Protein?

Per United States Department of Agriculture, Protein is an essential nutrient. The focus on vitamins simply aren’t enough. Foods made from meat, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, eggs, processed soy products, nuts, and seeds are considered part of the Protein Foods Group. Understanding protein isn’t so simple. Protein consists of amino acids and not all amino acids may be supplemented as pills. Of the 20 various amino acids, nine are “essential,” meaning you can only get them from food.

Proteins in many shapes and forms are associated with the fitness or illness of body muscles whether voluntary (skeletal muscles) or autonomic (heart and organs). Proteins found in the brain may be associated with storage and loss of memories. Every living cell in the body requires protein to build and maintain bones, muscles and skin.

In the United States, the recommended daily allowance of protein is 46 grams per day for women over 19 years of age, and 56 grams per day for men over 19 years of age. There are variables for activity. Considering dietary protein is important. Consumption of some proteins may lead to allergies or respiratory effects. Red meat proteins may aid cholesterol accumulation in arteries as cause for heart attacks.

Conversely, certain near ketosis diets combining vegan protein A 20-year prospective study of over 80,000 women found that those who ate low-carbohydrate diets that were high in vegetable sources of fat and protein had a 30 percent lower risk of heart disease compared with women who ate high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets.

If you are normal, getting your vitamins and protein drearily may help healthy aging and longevity.

Unfortunately, there is a group of over 100 disease variants that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass. In muscular dystrophy, abnormal genes (mutations) interfere with the production of proteins needed to form healthy muscle. There are no cures and treatments. These muscular dystrophies may occur at birth and in adulthood. From mild to severe, the illness is pervasive and crippling. While dietary protein still is significant for general health, it is believed that key protein and peptide conversions do not work in activating or stimulating muscle growth.

Prior to the classifications of muscular dystrophy it was a widely held belief that s lack of protein or nutrition resulted in myopathy or weak muscles. The word “dystrophy” comes originally from the Greek “dys,” which means “difficult” or “faulty,” and “trophe,” meaning “nourishment.”

It is believed that Muscular Dystrophy, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population and is considered a rare disease. There are 70,000 known cases in Western Europe.

Muscular Dystrophy, as genetic, is considered a form of mitochondrial diseases that affect several symptoms. These diseases may affect 1 in 4,000 people. This makes it less rare than most statistics for muscular dystrophy.

Muscular dystrophy is a disease related to muscles exclusively. Mitochondria diseases may be behind neuromuscular diseases. Neuromuscular diseases affect both nerves and muscles. One such disease is Multiple Sclerosis. Paralysis rom brain or spine is neuromuscular.

Inconclusive research seems to indicate a genetic protein called dystrophin. Dystrophin is part of a group of proteins (a protein complex) that work together to strengthen muscle fibers and protect them from injury as muscles contract and relax. Research suggests that the protein is important for the normal structure and function of synapses, which are specialized connections between nerve cells where cell-to-cell communication occurs. So far, The Muscular Dystrophy Association might see possibilities for only 2 of the many muscular dystrophy issues.

A 2015 study showed some evidence that a protein carbohydrate shake after an MDA approved exercise may be beneficial to muscular dystrophy patients.” The findings suggest that postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation could be an important add-on to exercise training therapy in muscular dystrophies, and long-term studies of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation are warranted in these conditions.”

If you’re healthy and well. Feed your muscles, cells, skin, and bones with positive sources of protein. While genetic testing is not considered routine in the USA, following a responsible dietary vitamin and protein regimen may support wellness over your lifespan. Consider responsible consumption of high protein foods or have a protein shake.

People suffering from acute or chronic pain or disabilities generally need more nutrition to exert any movement. Subsequently, having portable protein and nutrition sources are almost necessary. The flaw is nutrifying without gaining weight. Being overweight can make movement more difficult.

Lean sources of protein help normal people preserve their bones, muscles, and skin longer. Check with a nutritionist or your physician.

Nothing remains conclusive about Muscular Dystrophy and Protein consumption relieving or treating symptoms. As I have mobile challenges from Muscular Dystrophy, I find that a Protein/Nutrient bar is essential assurance. It may be a placebo or may be necessary. Perhaps, one day, there will be more3 conclusive studies into the co-factors that help reverse the challenging effects of wasting muscles. It just might include the needs for (more than) basic nutrition. For now, it is just a fantasy.

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