Don’t Drag your feet get your toes off

Street observations often show that quite a few people of all ages seem to drag their feet, gliding slowly on pavement. Some walk slowly, taking small steps, careful not to trip or fall. Are these people tired, weak, in pain or depressed? Sometimes all of these are in play. Emotion disorders for some may loosely involve motion disorders. This mode of walking is called Foot Drop. It is where the ankle does not elevate your foot to stride comfortably. The key to a normal and smooth gait is placed on what is called a dorsal muscle that, basically, works to get your toes off the ground. In some cases, a Toe-Off orthosis might help lift your toes off for better walking.

The ankle of each foot lies at the base of each leg as it meets the foot. It is often vulnerable to sports injuries or falls. How many kids complain about sprained ankles? How many game players have to sit through a season because of an ankle problem? Usually, these wounds heal. For others, there are diseases that chronically affect the foot. This makes walking difficult and painful. This makes walking alongside friends annoying. Most people adapt to it while others use orthotics, canes, walkers, and wheelchairs. These are entirely different perspectives than those that normally walk.

The joint at which the leg meets the foot is called a dorsal joint. This connecting joint consists of bone, ligaments, and muscles. There are four muscles involved – Tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis-longus, extensor digitorum longus and fibularis tertius. The largest and most evident of these muscles is the tibialis anterior, which can be seen superficially in the front of the lower leg. Dorsiflexion involves these muscles for just a couple functions, primarily lowering and lifting the foot for walking. It also aids left/right motion for smoothness and capability of coping with hills. Dorsiflexion helps establish the toes off and toes on movements that are necessary. When dorsiflexion doesn’t function, the foot remains in a dropped position. Getting your toes off for a normal gait is virtually impossible.

There are other muscles that help the dorsal muscles function. Nearby, Plantar flexion involves lifting the whole body. These go together because the world does not exist as a straight plane and body’s weight creates all sorts of subtle adaptations to the differences of weight, angles, and voluntary movement. Because the ground constantly has variables, human feet need to adapt to smoothly interface with it swiftly on contact. In normal function and anatomical position, the ankle joint has flexion (dorsiflexion) and extension (plantar flexion). Foot draggers have a lot to do to get their toes off the ground.

For many foot draggers, a trip to a physiatrist might help deal with the problem. Some may require physical therapy to help break old habits. Others may need a prescription orthosis. The latter occurs when certain diseases chronically influence the dysfunction of the dorsal muscles. One particular orthosis for helping people get their toes off the ground is a bracing device called Toe-Off.

Toe-Off is part of a group of products, called an Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO), that help replace the action of the dorsal muscles, when the muscle group has been compromised. This is common in muscular dystrophies, myopathies that can waste these muscles to the point that your foot can longer raise on its own. Toe-OFF is a new generation AFO, covered by several patents. While most AFO get your toes off and up to facilitate a more natural walking gait, and share some similarities, Toe-Off is lighter and easier.

Toe-Off is known as a dynamic AFO. It is made of a lightweight moldable carbon fiber composite material and works with various shoe types. It employs a high activity design that enables freedom of motion and allows for simulated walking that functions and appears as if you aren’t using any form of brace, with the exception of a few chronic cases. Whether custom of off-the-rack, a dynamic AFO encourages range of motion, allowing children to learn movement by moving and providing minimal support, only where the patient needs it. Scientific research on dynamic AFO devices show improved performance, though studies must be further explored.

Many AFO allow use of your own shoes. You remove the insole of the shoe, slide Toe-Off inside and then replace the insole. Most shoes aren’t adequately sized to hold your foot and an AFO. Sometimes you may find greater comfort by shifting to a wider shoe. New Balance and Dr. Comfort are recommended brands. Do not anticipate normally long wear from your shoes. Typical daily wear might be around 6 months and leather shoes should be changed every 6 weeks or so to keep it supportive (as leather stretches).

Toe-Off uses a Swedish technology that uses a carbon fiber for support or action. When worn, it does take your toes off the ground. Your walking gait is more normal.

Toe-Off resembles an over-the-calf shin guard, set in place by adjustable Velcro straps. Shoes are ties normally. It provides leg support and foot support as it aids that toes off process.

To say that use of Toe-Off will let you run marathons or play basketball is a rare exception. It helps a foot dragger with foot drop walk virtually normal. That is remarkable.

The feel of the Toe-Off is like standing on a suspended rocking chair. It rocks your foot into the appropriate position. Depending on your condition, getting up from a chair or using stairs may be a little difficult. Toe-Off primarily focuses on replacing the simple dorsal inaction that results in foot drop. Maneuvering other than walking may still be difficult or impossible. For someone who can’t walk normally, Toe-Off is a necessary option for those who want mobility without resorting to a scooter or wheelchair device.

Because even smoothly paved roads have variable surface changes, use of a cane is helpful in those cases. Many times you may not need it or use it lightly. When the walkway has cracks, embedded rocks, or other surface irregularities, that cane could be the difference from walking to falling.

A physiatrist or sports physician usually must prescribe an AFO and Toe-Off requires a prescription. It’s an expensive technological tool but is covered by many health insurances. Usually, your doctor sends you to an orthosis specialist. Prothotic Labs is a New York based progressive Prosthetic and Orthotic facility. David Zwicker is one of their specialists. He is particularly attentive to patient’s comforts in using any of these devices. While Toe-Off, for example, is an excellent product, it may need to be fitted for comfort for individualized use, Zwicker specializes in this. Developing a cordial relationship with your orthosis specialist is necessary. Finding one is crucial. An AFO is a walking mobility device that replaces poor natural muscle control. You and it must act comfortably as one.

As for support, there are 3 Toe-Off models that cover children, moderately affected adults, and severely affected adults. Due to Myotonic dystrophy (one of the muscular dystrophies) I use the Toe-Off BlueRocker pair – their offering for severe cases. It is designed for helping Footdrop from disorders such as stroke, MS, post-polio, Myelomeningocele, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular dystrophy, CMT, and forms of Neuropathy. This is my second Toe-Off AFO and I find it to be very supportive. It does require the Comfort Link accessory for extra padding around the leg.

Braces have changed a lot since the days of President Franklin Roosevelt. They help easily mobilize the otherwise immobile. Getting your toes off the ground as a means of alleviating foot drop means you have many choices to explore from exercise to using an orthosis. A dynamic AFO, like the Toe-Off family of products, may just be a possible answer. So don’t drag your feet when walking. Get your toes off and seek professional help. Treatment is often easier than you might think.

Toe-Off is not a miraculous cure for the causes of dorsiflexion. You may or may not be comfortable using it, and may not restore your walking range before your ankle disorder. Depending on the severity of your condition, Toe-Off helps provide a sense of dignity at the challenges of achieving upright mobility when walking. Many people do regress to needing scooters. It’s an acquired, adaptive taste and a quiet idea of walking using your own two feet, albeit with an AFO brace like Toe-Off. A dynamic AFO, under advisement from your physician, may help you cope with walking challenges a little differently (at least for a while). Isn’t it time to get your toes off and walking?

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