Heavy Metals and heart health

Do you enjoy heavy metals? Heavy Metal may be great music. Your body requires metals (minerals) in trace amounts for stable health. Too much may be hazardous to your health, even poisonous. Metal and heavy metal nutrients can bring life and death. They are vital to cellular maintenance. Too many metals may contribute to heart attacks, strokes, and cancers. Know how much metal you need to enjoy life?

Metals are very important to your body’s normal functioning. Iron, for example, is found in hemoglobin, a molecule in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body. Iron is essential in tiny trace, An iron deficiency may lead to anemia, general fatigue, weakness. shortness of breath, and dizziness. Your body has many trace metals. Other metals your body requires are zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, chromium, and molybdenum. Many of these are included in most multiple vitamins. Some metals are often found in medicine formulas, such as aluminum, bismuth, gold, gallium, lithium, and silver. Then there are heavy metals like mercury, arsenic, and lead that are highly toxic to your body but essential for manufacturing products.

Exposure to heavy metals and their absorption into our body systems are often indirect and build-up is cumulative over time. Yet, most people don’t have an idea about the effects that even harmless metal exposure might have.

Very few realize that Calcium is a metal and also a vital nutrient for teeth and bones. It also is an active ingredient in common antacids sold in pharmacy and convenience stores. Some dairy products and dairy substitutes fortify additional calcium for marketing purposes. Accidental overdosing calcium is easy because of its availability. Calcium, over time, can contribute to the hardening of the arteries that may result in heart attacks and strokes. Even if your cholesterol is in the normal range!

Calcification can show up in breast tissue and, prior to crystallization, may not be detected by mammograms. Crystallized calcium may be the cause of many observed lumps in breasts. While most are not cancerous, calcium may (in certain conditions) be associated with forms of invasive cancer.

We have said that Iron is essential for health in trace amounts. Taking too much Iron in your diet can be lethal. Iron overdose has been one of the leading causes of death caused by toxicological agents in children younger than 6 years. While Iron in the bloodstream is vital for delivering oxygen to cells, overdose can kill cells. Large amounts of Iron is an extremely corrosive substance to the GI tract, and may induce abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Some heavy metals may be surreptitious and confusing. We are taught about how beneficial it is to eat fresh-water salmon and tuna fish. While there are many health benefits, seafood and fish store Mercury in their bodies, some more than others. In an average adult diet, Mercury levels may be harmless. Some fish and shellfish contain higher levels of mercury that may harm an unborn baby or young child’s developing nervous system. Five of the most commonly eaten fish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish, but, be advised, that eating more than 12 ounces of these low-mercury fish may be harmful in the long-run.

Mercury occurs naturally in the environment and can also be released into the air through industrial pollution. Mercury falls from the air and can accumulate in streams and oceans. Mercury transforms into methyl mercury in the water. Naturally, Fish absorb the methyl mercury as they feed in these waters and so it builds up in them. If young children are exposed to fish with high mercury levels, cerebral palsy, blindness and deafness may result. Methyl mercury damage is usually irreversible. Treatment is determined by the severity of the condition and is similar to that given for cerebral palsy.

According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, some forms of mercury may lead to muscle weakness, and mental disturbances. Mackerel, Shark, Swordfish, and Tilefish generally have the highest levels of mercury and are not recommended for pregnant women or young children. In its pure form, Mercury was once used in dental fillings and as an inactive base in some pills. What do they mean by inactive?

Supplements containing the metal Selenium make claims that it is beneficial at keeping thyroid levels in the normal range, among many other things. Most dietary Selenium comes from fish, grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, whole grains, and nuts.

The recommended dietary allowance of Selenium for adults is about 55 micrograms daily. It acts as a powerful antioxidant when combined with certain vitamins. Doses of over 200 micrograms daily may result in a form of diabetes. An overdose of selenium may cause bad breath, fever, nausea, and liver, kidney and heart problems. At high enough levels, selenium could possibly be a factor that results with death.

Think about lead poisoning, one of the more common toxic heavy metals. It was found in paint and gasoline up to the 1970’s. When homes are rented or sold, owners have to indicate a “lead notice” to prevent possible accidents from exposure to older paint layers. Sometimes toys imported from China may also have lead-based finishes. Accumulated exposure may be very harmful.

The signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in children may include: Developmental delay, Learning difficulties, Irritability, Loss of appetite, and Sluggishness and fatigue. There may also be abdominal issues.

There is one metal that your body really needs. It is called Magnesium for muscle, nerve, heart, ad bone health. Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. Prenatal magnesium deficiency has been inferred with autism and other early development disorders.

Excitability, Muscle weakness, and (excessive) Sleepiness have been associated with magnesium deficiencies. Getting your magnesium quota from foods is really easy. Most dietary magnesium comes from vegetables, such as dark green, leafy vegetables, legumes, whole-grain rice, nuts, and (some) soy products.

Though rare, magnesium overdose may lead to hypertension, vomiting, unintentional weight loss, slow breathing, kidney stress, and a possible calcium deficiency. While magnesium reportedly helps fight against accumulation of heavy metals in your body, further studies are needed.

There’s something wise about the health benefits of oysters. They are one of the foods that deliver the highest natural source of Zinc, another beneficial metal. For over 20 years, doctors claimed that Zinc can reduce colds from viruses.

Zinc has also been associated as beneficial to ADHD (attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder) and the development of Alzheimer’s Disease. Zinc may benefit skin and fertility. Sounds great, doesn’t it?

Taking too much Zinc may result in digestive problems and may lower your immunity system. Zinc competes with copper for absorption in the human body. Having an overdose of zinc unbalances your copper levels which become deficient. Taking too much Zinc may affect a change in taste and smell. Other Zinc side-effects may contribute to dizziness, chest pain, trouble breathing, fever, chills and jaundice, when taken at higher than recommended quantities.

Sometimes there can be too much of a good thing. Too much cake may make you fat. The acids in coffee may attack tooth enamel, for example. Too much milk brings healthy bones but possible circulatory problems. Certain seafood and fish may result in nerve disorders. It really is difficult. While heavy metals have benefits they may prematurely kiss you toward a stairway to heaven and a black Sabbath. Beware! Overdosing on heavy metals can impact the qualities of your life.

Heavy metals and metals may be nutritious and healthy in tiny amounts. Before dosing up or eating certain foods, especially when pregnant, their content in docile, everyday foods and supplements may be poisonous. Check with your doctor or nutritionist. The symptoms can be confusing but harmful if a possible associative suspicion is overlooked.

Many multivitamin supplements include metals as minerals. These small amounts help prevent deficiency but many of these come from healthy diets. How many people follow healthy diet guidelines? Sticking to that source will help you reap their benefits. It’s advisable not to over-supplement or you’ll reap consequences.

Careful review of heavy metals and metals in your diet may make the music of life more appealing.

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